CLASS 13: TUE OCT 15

Riddle

Model Visual Rhetoric

Lecture/Demo

66 Responses to CLASS 13: TUE OCT 15

  1. morra2024 says:

    10/15 Class notes
    0. Class started with a peculiar riddle, the goal of which was trying to determine who was the true African-American, the African-born naturalized U.S. citizen light-skinned Charlize Theron or the American-born dark-skinned Denzel Washington?

    1. One of best activities we ever did in class – dissecting videos to show how even a couple of seconds of adverts are saturated with unlimited detail, from which the viewer can clearly and unambiguously interpret the intended message. Our writing has to be the same: balancing absolute descriptive informativeness (as if explaining an image to someone blind) with maximum concision (due to word limits), all the while preventing the reader from coming to any conclusions other than the one intended by you as the writer.

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  2. Valcom says:

    Notes 10/15/19
    [] We started class with a riddle looking at two people and having to decide which one was “African-American.” The girl was from Africa while the guy was born in Detroit and raised in America.
    [] The Ad Council “Now” video is showing us a coach and two kids eating breakfast or dinner at a diner. We know that they are at a diner attached to a bowling alley because the background of the ad is showing us a whole story within thirty seconds.
    The focus within the first couple seconds is all on the front because of the movement from the hands and the motion from the kids. This shows a good coach who is most likely rewarding the kids for a win. Just within the first five seconds the whole video tells a story. All the information in an ad is played through visuals and sounds.
    [] In “Spot Animal Abuse?” the ad shows within the first second a dog lying on a veterinarian table that is injured. The dog was abused by someone that we do not know, but quickly learn about someone who abused the dog and the family itself.
    [] Always say what you have seen before you say what you know. When you describe the visuals that you see, you give the reader a judgement on what you are talking about. Limiting interpretation the reader can make , makes you a better writer.

    (I always leave my notes unposted!! So sorry, will try not to do this anymore. It is my third time.)

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  3. tenere84 says:

    (All caught up with notes!)

    10/15

    Riddle: Find the African American

    This riddle was very short; the objective was to determine which of the two people presented were African American. The white person and her parents were born in Africa and are American citizens. They are African American. The black person is not African American because he and his parents were born in Detroit, MI. Whether someone is African American depends entirely on whether they are American citizens of African descent, not on mere looks.

    The objective of conveying a message is to not waste content; every sentence and every visual counts. No unnecessary or irrelevant points that may cause confusion. We examined two advertisements: one that implored its viewers to intervene as soon as possible when abuse is present. The other displayed the results of a humble man’s kindness. Not a single second of these videos were wasted. This approach to conveying a message is effective because it lowers potential confusion or misinterpretation to a minimum.

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  4. comp0327 says:

    We began with the riddle, which honestly got me. I didn’t even stop to think about the labels we place on ourselves and others every day, especially in our writing. We then watched a video, which was meant to emphasize the effect of attention to small details in writing, not just as a reader but as an author as well. We finished the class by discussing visual rhetoric, and the significance of visual description to your audience, similar to the topic previously discussed. By incorporating images with meaning into each moment of the video or visual, your message is clearly expressed to the audience and they are impacted by the message more.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Thoughtful and intelligent as these notes are, comp0327, they’re still “talked about” language:

      which was meant to emphasize the effect of attention to small details in writing, not just as a reader but as an author as well . . . by discussing visual rhetoric, and the significance of visual description to your audience, similar to the topic previously discussed.

      I probably shouldn’t hold notes to such a high standard or nitpick about them, but the writing patterns that make us comfortable can keep us from advancing, so this is as good a place as any to bump you from your rut.

      What is the effect of small details?
      What is the significance of visual description?
      What was the topic previously discussed?

      We then watched a video, paying attention to the smallest details, each of which (whether the director intended it or not) persuaded the viewer to draw a conclusion. Our class discussion pointed out the parallel to our writing, that we’re in charge of our readers’ conclusions, and every word we use can help our readers draw the ones we want them to draw.

      Sure, it’s hard to digest classroom activities while we experience them and boil them down to bold clear claims, but the exercise is worth trying.

      3/3

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  5. bestbaker123 says:

    – Riddle: Obviously you would identify Denzel Washington as the African American, because he has the darker skin color. But Charlize is the person who was born in Africa but she has an American visa so she would be the African American.
    – The activity we did today was really interesting and I really liked it. Analyzing ads and dissecting the arguments in them thought us something about our own arguments.
    – You don’t put anything in your arguments by ACCIDENT, everything has a purpose and is planned.
    – Looking at the commercials, proved that even just a second of footage has sooo much going on to start the argument.
    – Everyone makes their own conclusions by reading your first sentence even if you try to direct the reader to think something else. They will draw 10 different conclusions if they want to.
    – Establish the main point of your argument in the first sentences and then pan out to the background info or support for your argument.
    – Use pathos, logos, and ethos to present a strong argument to your audience.

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    • davidbdale says:

      I’m glad to hear the exercise was so effective for you, Baker. Do you think it will help you actually craft better arguments, or at least make you more conscious of the choices you’re making, messages you’re sending?
      3/3

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  6. Riddle (Find the African American)
    – We were given pictures of two celebrities and asked to find which one is African American. One celebrity is of darker skin complexion and the other of fair skin complexion. In this case, the women with fair skin are the African American since she was born and raised in Africa and has obtained American citizenship, however, American society would rarely if at all consider her African American.
    Model Visual Rhetoric
    – In the opening second (still image) we can interpret a lot of information about what is going on in the ad.
    – Baseball coach sitting with two of his players in a diner
    – Bitters is shown which is used for cocktails
    – The diner is attached to a bowling alley (bowling pin in the background)
    – Two people sitting at a table behind the 3 main characters (makes it a public place)
    – Coach takes players out to eat after a game as a reward for winning their game
    – Advice and instruction being given by coach with hand gesture
    – The quality of the video looks homemade, dull, bleached colors, poorly made
    – Lady in back moves her hand which is not on the table
    – Coach moves his attention opposite of the 2 players to his son who looks happy
    – This kid’s attention is quickly directed somewhere else as seen by his gaze off-camera
    – The girl in the background has now joined gazes with the boy, acknowledging the boy is paying attention to her and she quickly turns away.
    – The coach makes a face to the situation behind him as if he should say something but doesn’t
    – The lady and the man in the background now seem to be in a confrontation and we are then asked a rhetorical question “when do you get involved?”
    – The once happy boy is now sad as the couple begins to fight and the man begins to abuse the women physically.
    Lecture/Demo
    – Imagine describing a visual argument to someone who can’t see what is going on
    – Don’t assume the readers have the information you have or understand the topic the way you do
    – Example: Showing someone has no money can be depicted by turned out pockets or an empty wallet. Both tell that someone has no money in a multiple of ways depending.
    – The ad is promoting people to do good, but its major goal is to sell life insurance
    – The man acts as a father or husband figure to the lives he effects

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  7. kraemercali says:

    whose African American riddle?
    videos- observe, whats obvious, don’t judge, take note of everything you see, allow to recognize before judge

    Liked by 1 person

  8. voxpopuli75 says:

    10/15/19
    -Rhetoric can be visual as well as textual.
    -You can get a lot of info from the first second of the video. This translates to writing because you should make your first sentence draw readers in.
    – You need to let your readers know all of the information necessary for them to draw the same conclusions as you. The readers do not know everything you know.
    -Get your readers completely involved in a sentence or two so they cant stop reading. It doesn’t take a lot of time to tell a big story to your reader.

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  9. ahntkd99 says:

    10/15
    Riddle
    – Find the African-American of two pictures ( Denzel and white lady)
    – Usually we think Denzel is a African American because his dark skin
    – However, the white lady was born in Africa and her parents are from Africa

    Visual Rhetoric Model
    – Watch 30 second clips and analyze it
    – First video was about violence abuse to women
    – Second video was about animal abuse

    Visual Rhetoric
    – Say what you’ve seen before you say what you know
    – Evaluate the rhetoric
    – Sample argument analysis
    – We analyze a story that a young Asian man (insurance ad)

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    • davidbdale says:

      White lady: Charlize Theron.
      These are not good notes, Ahn.
      They outline the content, but they don’t remind you WHAT TO DO, or WHAT YOU LEARNED.
      Read VoxPopuli’s notes a couple of spots above yours. Notice how different they are. Model yours after Vox’s.
      2/3

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  10. yankeefan25 says:

    Model Visual Rhetoric
    – nothing is accidental in these videos, everything there is on purpose
    – we diagnosed the first scene not even a second in and were able to get a ton of information just from the first frame
    – Just because some things placed in the frame we know that it is at a bowling alley and they serve drinks. We know he is a good guy because he took his teammates out to eat after the game.
    – The child was happy and now is upset by something
    – They use the man as an analogy as when to get involved and they use the text to further get their point across

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  11. 10/15 Notes
    -Writing needs to be descriptive and powerful–>Visual Rhetoric
    -Visual clues help to subtly build your argument and to help the reader draw conclusion about the visual.
    -Every detail can be used to draw a conclusion about ones argument, from the words/verbal message used to the very camera movements/position of the ad. Every moment of the ad says something.
    -Get readers involved in a sentence or two, immediately.
    -Say what you’ve seen, before what you know!
    -Selling a product can be made easier with a pathos approach –> Life insurance add

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  12. roses0102 says:

    10/15 Notes
    – We first saw a riddle about 2 famous people, ones skin color being dark in complexion and one being light in complexion. We were asked who was African American and it ended up being the lighter complexion women, her and her parents were all born in Africa.
    – We then talked about heartwarming ADS on t.v and how they deliver the emotion very quickly and briefly. The AD was set up from the first second to deliver the message conveyed in the 30 second ad. This relates to our writing because that is how we should convey our message or point of view on the topic that we are talking about.

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  13. 10/15
    NOTES

    Began class with our daily riddle which was two pictures of famous figures. One being a black man and one being a white woman. We were asked who was African American and you would think everyone would say the man, but he was born in the US and lives in the US while the woman was born is Africa, but now lives in the US making her technically an African American.

    – Learned the crazy amount of information you can maintain from just the first second of a commercial
    – One second into a video that is short can give you all the information about a video and you can possibly determine what it will be about
    – Everything is in the frame for a reason and it’s not just there for visual, but more there for purpose
    – Only a couple seconds in and you know the whole plot basically and you know a basic intro to the commercial
    – Visualizing the scene is important and if you do it you don’t need volume or more proof
    – The second video makes you want to get involved because of the emotional affect in the first second. This is what you want for your writings, as you want to get the attention of the reader in the first couple sentences and early on

    Visual Rhetoric
    – When writing you have to assume that the reader knows nothing about what you talking about and you need to change that early and effectively
    – You can get an insane amount of information about a person or topic just off a visual or picture

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  14. ajuuy7 says:

    Today’s riddle consisted of two people and asking who was African-America based off of who was actually born in Africa and not the color of their skin. We analyzed the first second of an ad to identify all the important concepts within it. The video symbolizes our writing and within the first 5 seconds or sentences a whole scene has to be made and engaging to readers. We analyze the second video the same way as the first. In the first second viewers are completely involved and cannot look away which is exactly what you want in your writing. You cannot assume the readers know the facts in your brain and they need to be explained thoroughly. Everything can be said in different ways so it is important which language we choose to write with.

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  15. bmdpiano says:

    NOTES:

    Model Visual Rhetoric:
    – Visual vs. Verbal argument
    – How commercials can move us in seconds and sends out a message.
    – Ad Council “Now” Video (no sound)
    1st second – Setting is at a diner, the man is a baseball coach and he is with two members of the team.
    Watching second by second. There is something that we learn every second because there is only 30 seconds to send a message. Each visual cue tells a story and is very important to the message.
    – Most of the information a reader can see is what the writer spells out for them.
    – The first second gets someone completely involved into the story line.

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  16. mpsj13 says:

    Visual Rhetoric
    -Everything said should work for your argument.
    -Nothing is accidental and everything you notice is important
    -Most information that can be shared with readers can be told by describing what you see or have seen.
    -It does not take a lot of time or words to tell a story

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  17. lucbe219 says:

    In the rhetoric model, everything needs to point inwards towards our original argument. Anything that is in the video is considered important. In the video, we can tell most of the story line within only one second or less through the very first visual. In your first paragraph of writing, you should have already establish your story line, or what you argument is. Most of the information you share with your readers, you have to tell them as well as you see it so that they can imagine it themselves. We need to get our readers involves within 1-2 seconds to stop them from reading somewhere else. Does not take a lot of language or time to create a good detailed story.

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  18. lg102015 says:

    10/15 Notes
    Riddle- We looked at a picture of 2 people a white women and a black man. We learn that the white women was the true African American and the black man was just an American who was born and raised in Detroit from American parents.
    Visual Rhetoric- we looked at 2 30 second videos, where we would stop each video and look at everything that was involved in the snap shot because if it is in there then it is important. So from this we learn that like the commercial everything you put in your writing is important. Your readers look and everything in your writing, so you want to make sure whatever you have is important to your writing. You also must be clear with your writing so your readers understand everything.

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  19. 10/15 Notes
    ~
    -We began class with a riddle. We compared two pictures, one man with a darker complexion and one woman with a lighter complexion. We were asked to determine which person was an African American. Most people would think that the man with the darker complexion is African American, but it is actually the woman. This riddle teaches to not look at something by just its outside appearance, but to possibly look deeper to find the answer.
    -We analyzed the first second of two advertisements to understand how to properly visualize a story to the viewer.
    -Our first sentence of writing needs to be as powerful as the first second of an advertisement and the rest of our essay needs to draw the reader in.

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    • davidbdale says:

      I wish you had spent as much time on the primary lesson as you did on the riddle, FB.
      [On a separate note, is it possible NOBODY recognizes Denzel Washington and Charlize Theron? I chose them because of their specific actual backgrounds. I didn’t have to invent their birth stories. Really curious to know this.]
      2/3

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  20. Analyzed the first second of advertisements to understand how to properly visualize a story to the viewer. When making an argument its key to give your reader the most likely interpretation.
    Always think that your reader is blind. It’s important to pick the proper terminology and interpretation to successfully clarify your points. When analyzing a visual, you’ll need to gauge how effectively the intended messages are delivered.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Unique notes, Imagination. Writing as if your reader is “blind” is apt. Also impressed that you picked up on the note that readers will draw the most likely interpretation, so we have to plan for those reactions.
      3/3

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  21. The riddle

    African American does not associate to black people

    Today in class, we discovered how video can translate into an essay with how the video is set up. I think this is more easier to understand because us as people understand images better than words. The imagery we can use in video can be translated as equally into the imagery we can use in an essay, or in our language. This video basically shows how concentrated and strong our claims can be.

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  22. 10/15/19 Notes
    Visual Rhetoric Model
    – We take a look at two 30 second clips and analyze every second of the clips
    – Every single detail is important. Brevity and clarity makes a good argument.
    – Everything said and done contributes to the argument.
    – Logos, ethos, and pathos are used to develop a strong persuasive argument.
    – Several conclusions are drawn within the first second of a clip (or the first sentence of someone’s writing).
    Visual Rhetoric
    –Say What You’ve Seen Before You Say What You Know–
    – Describing visible components gives readers basis to evaluate your judgments
    –Evaluate the Rhetoric–
    – The best communicators limit the range of interpretations we can impose.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Dude! “The best communicators limit the range of interpretations we can impose.” I don’t know whether that’s your sentence or whether it came from my lecture notes, but I’d be proud to have written it. Take credit for it here if it’s yours. Kinda says it all.
      4/3

      Liked by 1 person

  23. We started class with a quick riddle. There was a picture of 2 people. A man and a woman. The man had darker skin than the female but the female did not seem 100% white. The riddle prompt asks to find the african american, to see if we would pick the male because he has darker skin. I think this riddle is to broadcast the idea that people are so diverse nowadays, you can’t judge a person’s ethnicity simply by looking at their face.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Not really. The riddle points out the weirdness of calling Americans born in America to American parents (like Denzel Washington) African-American just because their ancestors were African, while at the same time identifying Charlize Theron as a white American even though she was born in Africa to African parents.

      Certainly not the most important lesson of the day. Just a teaser. I’ll be looking in the Notes below for your comments about the Visual Rhetoric lecture/demos.

      1/3

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  24. hershey515 says:

    Comp 8 AM Class Notes

    Riddle
    – [ ] In the beginning of class we started of with a riddle that showed two famous people.
    – [ ] We must determine which one was the African American which ended up being the young lady. Most of us would’ve thought it would’ve been Denzel Washington because he dark in complexion but it was the white lady who is born and her parents are from Africa.
    Visual Rhetorical Model
    – [ ] We analyzed a 1 second clip to be able to state what is taking place in the clip. By paying attention to everyday detail and telling the story of what is going on.
    – [ ] Being able to draw out many conclusions all just from one line of a draft.
    – [ ] In the first video it was maybe a coach with his son and other baseball players at a diner whereby they witness the couple behind them is in a heated argument where he begins to harm her.
    – [ ] In the second video it was said to be a family with a dog getting abused. The lady had a black eye n the dogs leg was bleeding. This was to show how abuse when seen should be reported immediately.

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    • davidbdale says:

      You get your third point because of this line, Hershey: “Being able to draw out many conclusions all just from one line of a draft.” Without it, I couldn’t be sure you understood why we spent a whole class period looking at ads.
      3/3

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  25. lelebxby says:

    Model Visual Rhetoric
    -We analyzed the first second of advertisements to understand how to properly visualize a story to the viewer.
    -Like a video advertisement, when making an argument its key to give your reader the most likely interpretation.
    Lecture/Demo
    -Imagine your reader is blind. When doing this, it’s important to pick the proper terminology and interpretation to successfully clarify your points.
    – When analyzing a visual, you’ll need to gauge how effectively the intended messages are delivered.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. compclass8 says:

    We need to describe to readers in a way so they can make a visual. We need to have small details ignorer to add up to the main idea in order to make a clear visual.

    Like

  27. smellycat23 says:

    Class began with a riddle about being an African American. Denzel Washington was not the African American in the riddle but Charlize Theron was. Then we saw a short clip that provided a powerful message to teach young boys violence against women is wrong. Mr. Hodges says our writing must be powerful too with brevity and clarity. The first sentence can draw people towards or away your writing so it must be compelling.
    The second video we watched was about animal abuse. The creators of the video want the viewer to say something when animal abuse occurs. They show the dog injured and a woman with a black eye and then a young boy. A lot happens in 23 seconds to capture the reader’s attention. The last message we looked at was a few clips for life insurance. Many details are portrayed like how the man feeds the dog, gives money to homeless people, and helps an elderly woman.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      You picked up your third point with the observation that “The first sentence can draw people towards or away your writing so it must be compelling.” That wasn’t the only lesson today, but it was a crucial one.
      3/3

      Like

  28. iamsleepy01 says:

    – Watch the first second of a video to see a model visual rhetoric.
    – Draw conclusion from the information given.
    – In the first video in the first frame it showed the relationship between the people at the counter and people at the table behind the counter.
    – In writing, have to be clear on the interpretation or else the reader might misinterpret the writing.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Sleepy, you picked up your third point with the observation that we “have to be clear on the interpretation or else the reader might misinterpret” us. That wasn’t the only lesson today, but it was a crucial one.
      3/3

      Like

  29. Any word or sentence needs to be taken out of our writing if it is not used with purpose. Everything we say is crucial and we should not waste time or energy. Everything that is used should be used for the argument’s sake rather than for your own personal use. A video was shown and the first second of the clip was shown and broken down to show how much can be perceived from it. Even within a span of less than 30 seconds, pathos, ethos, and logos can be used in a film and that is how we must write.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. lazybear8 says:

    Visual Rhetoric:
    The tone of your argument is that it is real and happened/happening. Writing needs to be as powerful as these ads that convey great messages quickly and upfront. We draw conclusions because the director/writer wants us to. We can control what conclusions the reader draws by showing them what we want them to see. Everything you write should be deliberate in order to convey your opinion/argument, the same way that these ads show only what the directors want you to see. It’s difficult to effectively convey your argument without being obvious but it is possible.

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  31. athenapup4 says:

    10/15 Notes

    First second of a video
    Trying to describe the scene as if you were trying to describe it to a blind person. The point of seeing this ad was to show us that our writing needs to be as powerful. Just like the first second of an ad people can decipher the scene and what is possibly happening. It should be the same thing with the first sentence of your writing. It is your job to give the most likely interpretation of your paper just like an ad.

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  32. Anonymous says:

    – Watch the first second of the video to see a model visual rhetoric.
    – the videos on the first frame showed the relation between the people at the counter and the couple at the table behind the team. It was

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    • davidbdale says:

      Your notes probably looked lost because you hadn’t logged in when you tried to post them, Anonymous. They have to be moderated and approved before they can appear.

      If you want credit for attending class and participating, log in and leave some notes. Let me know in those notes that you were the “Anonymous” poster.

      Like

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