ICE: NFL Marijuana Letter

Letter Rewrite Exercise

VERSION 1

“VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the arguement made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing proffesional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed profesional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there phyical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recomended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijauna, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would recieve a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

VERSION 2

“VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

VERSION 3

Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

VERSION 4

In the Reply field below, copy and paste whichever version you believe to be the best so far. Using it as your rough draft, improve this letter to the editor for clarity and persuasiveness but without adding material.

When you have finished, open your own current draft of your A01: LTE and begin the honorable if sometimes frustrating work of making your writing less awful. 🙂

About davidbdale

Inventor of and sole practitioner of 299-word Very Short Novels. www.davidbdale.wordpress.com
This entry was posted in davidbdale, Professor Post, x ICE (In-class Exercise), x Writing Tips. Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to ICE: NFL Marijuana Letter

  1. munchkin1comp says:

    VERSION 3

    Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  2. bloo1comp says:

    VERSION 2

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I believe professional athletes would no longer be seen as positive role models or be able to safely compete.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. If pros are doing drugs, tomorrow’s youth will think they’re a shortcut to popularity and even athletic success. Besides, the NFL can do without the notion it encourages illegal drug use.

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point; users will be just as likely to injure themselves, even more so if they feel invulnerable. In addition, nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana, and who’s to say they won’t become addicts? Self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance on dosage for their “medication.”

    Allowing NFL players to use marijuana will harm players, fans, and the league. Players will get injured more often, impressionable youth would take-up drugs, and the NFL would be criticized for the decline in moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  3. tiger1comp says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” states Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. Marijuana could take away the image professional athletes have for children as positive role models and may increase the dangers of the sport if players are under the influence during a game.

    During my adolescence, model citizen Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins influenced me. If professional players are known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. Does the NFL want to be seen encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson considers painkillers more addictive than marijuana. But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain. Who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the reputation of the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values.

    Like

  4. mandragon1comp says:

    Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. Furthermore, as self prescribers the NFL players will likely not know the correct dosage of “medication”. Possibly leading to the same addiction that pain-killer represent.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  5. kai1comp says:

    Version 3

    Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana”. The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing under the influence.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to athletic success if the league relaxes its policy on marijuana. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially if being high makes them feel invulnerable. Also nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  6. perry1comp says:

    VERSION 2

    Nate Jackson, author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana based on the idea that “virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” If athletes are playing under the influence of marihuana, I believe they will no longer be able to safely compete or be seen as positive role models.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins, who were not only accomplished athletes, but model citizens as well. Children tend to emulate their favorite athletes, and if they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. By encouraging drug use, the NFL develops a negative image for fans of all ages.

    Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Jackson falsely compares marijuana to painkillers, and ignores the fact of painkiller addiction. If individuals can become addicted to painkillers, athletes and fans alike will soon become addicted to the enhanced ability and sense of well-being received from marijuana use. By the NFL encouraging drug use, they are paving the way for athletes and fans to struggle with addiction problems in the future.

    Like

  7. garwin1comp says:

    Version 4

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that professional football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing under the influence of illegal drugs.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes; if they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without the image of encouraging illegal drugs at the highest level of sports competition.

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and are just as likely to become addicted to the feelings created by marijuana as those created by painkillers. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Allowing NFL players to self medicate with marijuana will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured and impressionable youth would see the use of marijuana as normal behavior. The NFL needs to resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  8. dean1comp says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” is Nate Jackson’s argument of why the use of marijuana should be allowed in the N.F.L. Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and the recent article in the New York Times, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy,” argues that the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I object Jackson’s proposal due to the fact that NFL athletes may no longer be seen in a positive light and they won’t be able to safely compete if they are high.

    Growing up I looked up to the Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins and luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but off the field as well. If children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes using marijuana, it may lead children to believe that smoking pot is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic abilities. The NFL shouldn’t want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use by allowing leinincy to their professional athletes.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers by writing: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury because players will feel invulnerable. Another problem with that statement its that while prescription drugs are prescribed with a designated dosage, marijuana is not. It would be the players discretion on how much they smoked.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players are more likely to be injured.Children would be influenced to pick up the use of marijuana.The N.F.L. would recieve a backlash of negativity from an older generation for the moral values of the NFL disappearing . There is nothing absurd about the leagues policy, unlike Jackson’s proposal.

    Like

  9. mica1comp says:

    I believe Version 2 to be the best;

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change; it does not need to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition.

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, they could even become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability. Also, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Therefore, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    P.S. Although I understand all writing is crap and can be improved, it is always hard for me to change/revise works writing. When im reading I focus so much on what is trying to be said rather than focusing on how you can make this argument better. It is a weakness of mine(that I am trying to work on) and is why I hardly changed much to the version that I thought was best(even though i read it over and over again and tried to look for all its flaws).

    Like

  10. greentwinky1comp says:

    VERSION 4:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, the author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile.” Jackson believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. Professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers states “The policy…keeps [players] in a perpetual state of injury and injury management,” but misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  11. eagles1comp says:

    Nate Jackson makes a foolish suggestion encouraging the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” The former NFL player and author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the discipline players land for using medical marijuana is idiotic. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, and the pre game use of marijuana will lead to unsafe competition.

    During my childhood, players like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins were exemplary citizens to emulate. The NFL is already under a lot of scrutiny; tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the NFL relaxes its policies. Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers oversights an important point: nobody knows the correct dosage of marijuana and the invulnerability tokers feel will make it just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain.

    Along with the injuries, the absurd proposal leaves a negative influence on todays youth, which would lead to a lot of criticism from fans disappointed in the decline of moral values.

    Like

  12. bagofchips1comp says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes, tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Jackson fails to see that marijuana is considered a painkiller as well; the same risks that are associated with current drugs are carried over to its natural counterpart. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about correct dosage, nor will they seek that guidance from its employer.

    Allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  13. ovechkin1comp says:

    Nate Jackson encourages the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana”. The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As an NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles’ Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success, if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. It is also unknown how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Along with the injuries and negative influences on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is in fact “absurd.”

    Like

  14. iglesias1comp says:

    “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” Jackson argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object. Professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they are playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change, they will be seen as a corporation encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition.

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” However, marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and there is always the possibility that they could become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability given to them by the marijuana. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate is no good. It will just bring harm the players, the fans, and the league. Impressionable youth would be more likely to take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should keep drugs illegal for its players.

    Like

  15. syntaxattack1comp says:

    Nate Jackson, author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile”, would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana”. He believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, the use of marijuana will hinder my enjoyment of the sport because professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    As a child, I was greatly influenced by players like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. If the league relaxes its policy, tomorrow’s youth may think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. Along with the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Medicating players through the use of medical marijuana will cause the level of play to decline. Instead of giving players illegal drugs to reduce pain on the field, they should look more into caring for the prevention of injuries, and proper physical therapy after the fact.

    Like

  16. sparky1comp says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image as they do not want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. More players would be injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  17. jaime1comp says:

    VERSION 2

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a dedicated NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. My role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. To tomorrow’s youth, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity and athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and could become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

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