CLASS 16: THU OCT 24

Dog Riddle

Writing Plan

Guantanamo

Whatever Guantanamo Is Like, It Can’t Be Worse Than This.

 

58 Responses to CLASS 16: THU OCT 24

  1. tenere84 says:

    Notes 10/24/19

    Riddle: the dog’s face has survival value in that its eyebrows will compel predators to stay away, whether the dog is asleep or not.

    Which/That problems: The idea of your sentence can change depending on how you use which or that. Examples:
    “For he’s a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny.”
    – This sentence may have a certain intention but it conveys a different idea. The sentence literally means that this fellow cannot be denied by his peers.
    “For he’s a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.”
    – This sentence uses its words correctly and thus conveys a clear idea. It means that the fact that he is a jolly good fellow cannot be denied.

    In short, “which” refers to a group of words or an entire idea and must include a comma beforehand, while “that” refers to a single subject and does not need a comma.

    Characteristics of an Op-Ed as opposed to an Editorial:
    – They are written by one person, rather than a group.
    – Evidence is of much more value and should even be cited, while Editorials have fewer restrictions.
    – They may convey an opinion that is generally not accepted by his/her peers, or at least one that is unusual or surprising.
    – They are generally prepared for disagreement by their readers.
    – The writers of Op-Eds are not obligated to prove something.

    Steps to the Writing Plan:
    1.) Establish a clear thesis.
    2.) Provide background evidence so your readers are up to speed.
    3.) Provide sources, which will bolster your argument, that you have found.
    4.) Acknowledge the counter-arguments you need to refute.

    A good thesis statement is one that makes a clear and concise claim. It may be value judgement, moral judgement, a moral imperative, etc. They should not be observations or misuse words.

    Unclear/bad thesis statement: “The gun control movement has been very controversial.” (This thesis statement makes an observation but no claim.)

    Clear/good thesis statement: “Banning certain classes of guns is unconstitutional and counter to our Second Amendment rights.” (This thesis statement makes a moral judgement on the gun control movement.)

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  2. comp0327 says:

    Notes:
    -The dog riddle showed us the survival rate of a cute puppy, whose second set of ‘eyes’ allows predators to pass it by, and allowing survival.
    -We discussed the Op-Ed, which will be 1000 words, or around 5 pages.
    -We then read the linked article, which discusses people detained at Guantanamo bay for supposed without trial, or their basic rights.
    -Safety or ideals? We shouldn’t have to make that choice.
    -We discussed next sources for our Op-Ed, and the due dates.

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  3. morra2024 says:

    Class Notes 10/24

    0. Class started with a riddle about one dog breed’s evolutionary survival mechanism: their spots above their eyes make it look like they’re always awake. Main takeaway: a class note should be as brief and clear as a thesis.

    1. Submit Op-Ed Writing Plan by October 31st: the plan itself is a part of the Non-Portfolio grade, which in total is worth 20% of our total grade (the Portfolio being worth 75% and Class Notes being worth 5%). Op-Eds will be the largest assignment we do so far: 1000 words. The first sentence should immediately communicate our point of view. The Writing Plan consists of a thesis statement, background and evidence, sources found, sources haven’t found yet and counter arguments that need to be refuted. Included link: https://newspaperlessness.com/non-portfolio/writing-plan/

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  4. bane1900 says:

    Certain types of dogs that have spots over their eyes have a better chance of survival in the wild because when their eyes are actually closed, it appears they are not.
    Guantanamo Bay is a place where “battlefield enemy combatants” are held with sub human rights and are treated like animals.
    Writing plan is going to be based on articles that support your opinion

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  5. lazybear8 says:

    Riddle:
    The survival factor of the dog shown was its eyebrows’s spots made to look like eyes.
    A good note is a lot like a good thesis statement. Content of material with good subject and verbs.
    Writing Plan:
    The writing plan will help with the writing of the longest piece of writing in this class. Thesis Statement.
    Background and Evidence: Summarize the evidence found for your op-ed and argument.
    Sources I have found: Links to the sources, and then describe them using purposeful summary, an skill we previously worked on.

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  6. iamsleepy01 says:

    Dog Riddle- the riddle was why the dog survived a long tine. The spots above the dogs’ eyes look like eyes that looks at the predators.
    In the writing plan for our op-Ed we should have a thesis statement, background and evidence, sources, and counter arguments.

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  7. lg102015 says:

    Class Notes 10/24/19
    To start off class we went over how spots above a dogs eye can change the way a predator looks at them. It is known that a predator is less likely to attack when they have eyes staring back at them. so even when the dog is sleeping, they have the look like eyes are staring at them.
    Then for the majority of the class we went over the Writing plan which is do October 30th at midnight. Before we write the final draft for our Op-ed we are asked to come up with a writing plan.
    This writing plan should include
    1. Thesis Statement
    Here you’ll make a clear and compelling claim on a very specific topic you believe you will be able to persuasively prove with adequate evidence in the course of your own Op-Ed.
    2. Background and Evidence
    Here, you’ll summarize the material you’ve gathered in a few short paragraphs.
    3. Sources I Have Found
    Here you’ll provide links to the best material you have found to shape and support your point of view.
    4. Sources I Haven’t Found Yet
    As the deadline looms, you’ll probably still be looking for another or a better source. Saying so here serves two purposes: 1) it indicates you know what’s missing from your argument so I don’t have to wonder what you’re thinking; 2) it may prompt somebody to share a source with you.
    5. Counterarguments I Need to Refute
    Your paper will only be persuasive if it acknowledges and refutes obvious and strong (or surprising and strong) arguments from other points of view. Let me know here what arguments you’ll need to counter.
    After this the first draft of the op-ed essay will be due on november 7th

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    • davidbdale says:

      Brilliant Notes, LG, except for the pronouns, which, after the Riddle, sound as if they were written from your Professor’s point of view. But that’s quibbling. These echo the best aspects of Thesis Statements.
      3/3

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  8. we started class talking about dogs and how “we don’t like them because they are cute, but they are cute because we love them”. Also the spots above dogs eyes are to warn predators. Then we went over some articles that would help us with our next Op-Ed assignment. We also went over some examples over op-ed’s to give us a better grasp of how they are written and from what perspective they come from.

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    • davidbdale says:

      These Notes indicate you attended class, AB, but not much else. Your first claim contains a classic “Not Because” error, indicating that we don’t like dogs. The rest is mostly “talks about” language that wouldn’t help you much if you returned to it in a few weeks to collect the kernel of knowledge in each lesson component.
      1/3

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  9. bmdpiano says:

    NOTES:

    Riddle:
    -The survival value of a small and cute dog?
    -Puppy eyebrow spots increase survival by imitating being awake and imitating open eyes.
    -Tricks predators.

    Grammar:
    For he’s a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.
    For he’s a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny.

    -These mean two different things.
    -“that” modifies the “fellow”. No one can deny him as a person. No one can say “no” to him.
    -“which” modifies the entire claim. No one can deny “he’s a jolly good fellow”

    Writing Plan:
    -Writing pitch for an essay and a non portfolio task
    Elements of Plan
    1. Thesis Statement – A clear and compelling claim specific to the topic that is an opinion. It shows the writer’s side of the argument right away. Do not shy away from opinion because it is the unpopular opinion.
    2. Background and Evidence – Provides explanation of the topic. Summary of the anticipated approach.
    3. Sources – Provides links to the sources and a small description of the source is given. Do not prove, support.
    4. Sources not found yet – What is wished to find or what is still being searched.
    5. Counterarguments I Need to Refute – Counter the other sides to the topic

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  10. mpsj13 says:

    Riddle
    -A puppy increases its survival rate by adapting spots above its eyes to imitate being awake to predators while it is sleeping.
    Which/That
    -Which modifies a whole claim while that modifies a subject
    *”For he’s a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny” This says that no one can deny that he is a jolly good fellow
    *”For he’s a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny” This says that he is a fellow that no one can say no to
    *”The class next door that was painted smells like paint” This distinguished between more than one classroom
    *”The class next door, which was painted, smells like paint” This is added information.
    -These examples are all correct, but they hold different meanings.
    Writing Plan
    -Consists of:
    Thesis
    *Compute a clear and compelling claim of your opinion on a very specific topic
    Background and Evidence
    *Summarize material you have collected and organize evidence to create a brief draft.
    Sources I have found
    * Link all of the best material found on your subject. Include a one paragraph summary of the material you have found.
    Sources I have not found
    *Anticipate what will still need to be found and ask for help if needed in finding a source
    Counter arguments I need to refute
    *Find arguments that you will need to counter in your op-ed.

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  11. ajuuy7 says:

    The riddle about a dog had an advantage of survival because of the light patches in its eyebrows to warn off predators into imitating open eyes. Nobody can deny the claim “He’s a jolly good fellow” in “For he’s a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.” In the sentence “For he’s a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny,” is saying no one can deny that specific fellow. Thesis statement is a reasonable good sounding defense proven by logic and information from other sources and should be very clear on your opinion. There needs to be a lot of background information with sources that prove your claim. You need to know what people might counteract with and be prepared to refute those claims. Midnight on Wednesday writing plan is due.

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  12. voxpopuli75 says:

    10/24/19
    -Dont use “Talk about” language when taking notes
    EX: “Todays riddle showed how the dog’s eyebrow spots increased its survival value by making
    predators think it is awake by imitating open eyes”
    not: “Todays riddle was about dogs”
    – “That” is used when you need to define something more specific while “which” is used more generally.
    – Letters to the editors have very low burdens of proof, while in an editorial you don’t try to make a proof at all. However in a OP-ED you have small burden of proof, you don’t need irrefutable evidence.
    -Editorial Draft due in two weeks, writing plan due halfway through.

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    • davidbdale says:

      There’s a lot to like here, Vox. But I don’t think you’d get a clue about That/Which usage from reading these notes. I do like the “burden of proof” section, though, which I haven’t seen elsewhere.
      3/3

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  13. lucbe219 says:

    Today to start class we looked at a riddle where a dog with spotty eyebrows will always look awake and the eyebrows have kept the breed alive through evolution. Next, we skipped over to grammar where we had to figure out when we should use ‘which’ or ‘that’ in a sentence through an example. ‘That’ is used to further describe one thing whereas ‘which’ is used to describe the whole first claim of a sentence. Later we went on to creating an Op-Ed plan for our papers due on Wednesday October 30th in the non-portfolio category. We need sources, links, and casual citations.
    5 Things we Need to Include:
    1. thesis
    2. background and evidence
    3. sources
    4. current sources that haven’t been found yet
    5. counterarguments that need to be refuted

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  14. 10/24 Notes:
    -Riddle: We determined the brown eye brows on a puppy increase his survival by imitating being awake.
    -Make sure to say something with your notes and writing as well while not wasting words with filler content or fluff.
    That= specific to one thing, a modifier of one object
    Which= modifier of not one specific thing, receives commas, and can be separated from the sentence
    -A writing plan is almost like a proposal for what you want to write about, allows you to effectively plan accordingly and assure that you have a secure amount of information to back your claims while also planning out what you want to be said about your timely subject.
    -While Letter to the Editor and Editorial pieces require no proof or evidence, an Op-Ed does need a reference of casual citations throughout the writing.
    -We looked at a few examples of sources for a sample Op-Ed.

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  15. yankeefan25 says:

    We started off the class by going over the riddle about the photo of the dog. The dog has brown spots on its eyebrows which make it appear that he is awake when he is in fact sleeping. This helps him sleep in peace when he is in the wild. This gives them an edge on predators.
    That and Which Rules
    Both can be correct but can make the sentence mean different things. When using “that” it identifies one item, but when you use “which” it can mean multiple items. Which can be used to identify a claim from the start of the sentence instead of attaching the end of the sentence to just one word.
    Writing Plan
    Important to have a strong thesis that makes clear claims one specific topic that we will be talking about. Identify the topic and make it obvious what side you are on.

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    • davidbdale says:

      What you say about “that” attaching to the end of a sentence is fascinating, YF, but not correct. I love the insight, but of course, the “that” can occur in the middle of a long sentence. Still, astute of you to notice. What you say about that and which is true in the examples, just not always.
      I like “sleep in peace [when he is] in the wild.” And I like “This gives them an edge on predators.”
      I’ve said this before, but please take note to avoid overuse of “it” and “that.” For example, you say

      When using “that” it identifies one item, but when you use “which” it can mean multiple items.

      when better writing would say

      “That” identifies one item, but “which” can refer to an entire clause.

      You’re more than entitled to disagree, or to question what’s BETTER about the second version. But you’ll have to argue back to earn the right to use the former.
      2/3

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  16. roses0102 says:

    10/24
    – Riddle- The spots above the dogs eyes looks like eyes, so predators stay away from it and think that it is awake. This heightens the survival value of the dog,
    – Prof. Hodges spoke about writing good notes, not using talked about language.
    – We went over using “which” in sentences. Usually when using which, both sentences are grammatically correct, but the “which” gives it specificity.
    – Op-Eds must include a strong and significant thesis statement
    – By October 31st,we will have a writing plan for our Op-Ed
    – By 2 weeks after that, we will have a final draft of our op-ed

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    • davidbdale says:

      l like your Riddle explanation, Roses.
      Your caution to avoid “talked about” language USES TALKED ABOUT LANGUAGE.

      – Prof. Hodges spoke about writing good notes, not using talked about language.

      Your that/which makes no sense to me.

      – We went over using “which” in sentences. Usually when using which, both sentences are grammatically correct, but the “which” gives it specificity.

      2/3
      (You could explain to earn back your point.)

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  17. ahntkd99 says:

    10/25
    Dog Riddle
    – It showed a photo of a dogs (puppy)
    – What is the survival value of this face?
    -What would a predator think?
    – The spots above dog’s eyes to warm predators

    Example of Riddle note
    – “Puppy eyebrow spots increase survival by imitating being awake.”

    Writing Plan
    – Thesis Statement: make a clear and compelling claim on a very specific topic
    Reasonable and persuasive evidence
    – The purpose of the Op-Ed is to provide a logical and convincing case for a personal opinion
    Background and Evidence
    – Summarize the material you’ve gathered in a few short paragraphs
    Sources I have Found
    – The sources yo identify here will not necessarily be cited in your eventual Op-Ed which is not a research paper and which often makes only the barest citational references to its supporting docs.
    Sources I haven’t found yet
    – Two purposes: it indicates you know what’s missing from your argument so I don’t have to wonder what you’re thinking / it may prompt somebody to share a source with you
    Counterarguments I need to refute
    – Be persuasive if it acknowledges and refutes obvious and strong arguments form other points of view

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  18. 10/24
    NOTES

    Daily Riddle
    – About Survival value of the puppies face
    – The change of hair color above his eyes make a predator think it is still awake and watching
    – Prof showed us clear note taking on the riddle and how to make it more condense and effective

    – ‘Which’ and ‘that’ may seem very similar in sentences, but applying ‘which’ would be supporting the complete claim before while ‘that’ just supports one thing (example: Which – Supports…For he’s a jolly good fellow / That – Supports… Good fellow)
    – ^ Both word choices are correct and send different messages which is where people get caught up

    Writing Plan: isn’t the essay, but rather a pitch to the essay

    – Discussing how to write a Op-Ed writing plan
    – Writing plan must include: Thesis, background, sources found, sources not found and counterarguments
    – Background and Evidence: the juicy part of your writing and if written well, you won’t have much writing to do in your draft
    – Sources Found: helps sculpt your argument and are main points you apply to your argument
    – Sources Not Found: when you have a an argument and sources, but could have better support which you haven’t found yet
    – Counterarguments: the other side of the argument and how you can possibly refute against them

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  19. Dog Riddle
    – The dachshund’s spots above its eyes (eyebrows) can look like eyes themselves when it is sleeping.
    – These spots give this dog a minor survival value in which may deter predators from attacking when the dog is asleep because they imitate open eyes and awareness.
    Grammar Note
    – For he’s a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.
    – (Means nobody can deny the claim that he is a jolly good fellow)
    – For he’s a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny.
    – (Means he is a fellow nobody can deny)
    Writing plan
    – Beginning of 2-week project to write an Op-Ed (Proposal due Oct 31)
    – Thesis statement: make a clear and compelling claim on a very specific topic you believe you will be able to persuasively prove.
    – Op-Eds are written to provide a logical and convincing case for a personal opinion.
    – Background and evidence: summarize the material you’ve gathered in a few short paragraphs. (with sources)
    – State sources who haven’t found yet that you are in the process of looking for. It indicates that you know that there is something missing from your argument and are actively searching or it.
    – Acknowledge counter arguments and refute them.

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  20. Notes 10/24+
    ~
    -Began class with a riddle regarding a puppies’ survival rate. The dog in the picture would survive a predator because even with its eyes closed, the spots on his face make it look like he’s awake.

    Small Lecture
    -Our notes need to be detailed. Students should pack an efficient amount of detail within one sentence. Make a claim, answer a question.
    -Discussed differences between whether to use “which” or “that” within a statement

    Writing Plan
    -Writing plan for Op-Ed is due Oct. 31st. It should been 1000 words or 5 pages.
    -The main components of our writing plan will be:
    1.) Thesis Statement: Making a clear and compelling claim based on our topic.
    2.) Background and Evidence: Summarizing material gathered in a few short paragraphs.
    3.) Sources Found: Provide links to the best material found regarding topic.
    4.) Sources Not Found Yet: Indicating you know what is missing.
    5.) Counterarguments to Refute: Refuting strong and obvious arguments from other points of view.

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  21. Today we had this riddle of a dog with “eye” eyebrows. The puppies eyebrows looked like it had eyes, theoretically to thwart of predators while the little puppy sleeps. The little ”eye” eyebrows are meant to make predators think they are awake.
    We also talked about taking good notes because taking horrible notes is just laying you submissive to destroying yourself later.
    A really clear rule between which and that is that “that” is more specific, and “which” is more general for a statement.
    “For he’s a jolly good fellow, (which nobody can deny)”
    “For he’s a jolly good (fellow), that nobody can deny”
    Professor is very proficient in speaking. He can definitely be a talk show host, or a celebrity.
    We have a 2 week project. Professor warned us, but I did not prepare.
    An 8 o clock comp 2 class on monday sounds like a sleepy morning, but the professors personality makes it tempting.
    America still has guantanamo bay.
    Writing plan: pitch for the essay, proposal for the essay. Find 3-4 articles. Whats useful about them.
    Controversy
    Arguments
    Provocativity (only for your educational arguments)
    5 steps for your writing plan
    Non portfolio
    1 draft
    75% – portfolio
    20% – non portfolio
    5% – participation
    More about puppies
    Letter to the editor offers a little bit of an opinion
    Editorial has just logic
    Op-Ed has alot of opinions
    “My friends need a place to crash” – “turkish cousin with friends who caused 9/11”
    Professor literally pronounced “Lakhdar Boumediene and Mustafa Ait Idir’s”

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    • davidbdale says:

      Love your playful Notes, Kittens.

      Let’s clear up something about evolution. Nothing evolves FOR A REASON. The question, “Why do these weeds grow so low to the ground?” cannot be answered, “To avoid the lawnmower.” The lawnmower makes life hard for the tall weeds so the low weeds survive, multiply, and crowd out the tall ones. The low ones didn’t ADAPT; they SURVIVED, and therefore spread their seeds, and therefore triumphed numerically, which makes them look as if they had a plan. As if weeds had a plan.

      This is unclear but fascinating:

      We also talked about taking good notes because taking horrible notes is just laying you submissive to destroying yourself later.

      I’m intrigued by the phrase “laying you submissive,” a construction I’ve never heard.

      In your That/Which, I would have placed the parentheses differently. See if you agree.

      “(For he’s a jolly good fellow), which nobody can deny”
      “For he’s a jolly good (fellow) that nobody can deny”

      3/3

      Like

  22. kraemercali says:

    10/24
    Dog riddle- evolved,
    Todays riddle showed a photo of a puppy and asked about its survival value, features, eyebrows,to protect against predators
    Puppy eyebrow spots increase survival by imitating being awake (open eyes)
    Jolly good fellow sentences, which vs that
    For hes a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.
    For hes a jolly good fellow that nobody can deny.
    Writing plan for op ed- pitch for essay, proposal
    Non portfolio project- writing plan, thesis
    Read Guantanamo writing

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  23. 10/24/19 Notes
    Dog Riddle
    – We look at an image of a dog with dots for eyebrows and wonder what is the survival rate of it’s face. We concluded that predators stayed away assuming the dots were the dog’s eyes.
    We review how we take notes in class.
    – A good note is a lot like a thesis statement
    Writing Plan
    – Writing plan for Op-Ed will be due by Oct. 31 ( This is not a major assignment. It falls into the Non-Portfolio Tasks category, worth 20% of overall grade. It cannot be rewritten for credit.)
    – Thesis statement: Has clear and compelling claim on a very specific topic. The standard for an Op-Ed is “reasonable and persuasive evidence.”
    – Background and Evidence: A brief first draft compiled with a summary of materials gathered will be due by THU Nov. 07.
    – Multiple links are provided as sources to use to shape and support our point of view.
    – Counterarguments I Need to Refute: The Op-Ed must acknowledge and refute obvious and strong arguments from other points of view.
    Assignment:
    – Writing plan, due WED OCT. 30, must include Thesis, Background, Sources I Have Found, Sources I Haven’t Found, and Counterarguments I Need to Refute.

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  24. hershey515 says:

    Comp 8 A.M Class Notes

    Riddle
    – [ ] We started out class with a riddle about how identify the subject using vivid words
    – [ ] “The spots above dogs eyes, look like the eyes, to warm predators”.
    Writing Plan
    – [ ] We will be conducting a 1000 word essay that is an opinion based writing piece
    – [ ] It used sources in its writing for research but doesn’t have the same level of proof. It’s not required to prove your subject.
    – [ ] The writing plan in a non portfolio writing piece. It has to have a thesis statement, source you collected, and why they were chosen. This is not in the direction of counterarguments.
    – [ ] Your thesis statement should make a clear and significant claim
    – [ ] Writing Plan Due October 30th

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  25. Op-Ed’s are the next writing piece for this semester. An Op-Ed does not need to prove its point, but rather to convince the reader. It is a lengthy writing piece, about 1000 words, as compared to the other assignments so far. An example of a writing plan was given, and it was written a couple years ago about Guantanamo Bay and the imprisonment of war criminals with no process of law other than suspicion. For the writing plan, a thesis needs to be constructed first. One that can be wordy and explain more fully what your opinion may be. Secondly, background and evidence needs to be collected and explained through to use in your argument. Sources need to be collected and put in the writing plan as well as the sources that have not yet been used. Lastly, arguments that you may need to refute should be on our scope and we should be able to argue against those other opinions.

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  26. Dog riddle: the spots of dogs’ eyes, look like eyes, to warn predators.

    Writing Plan: Will be used for op-ed to get started and organize our material. Discussed bad and good examples of thesis statement, background and evidence, sources found, sources not found yet, and counterarguments needed to refute. Writing Plan is due Oct. 31

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  27. bestbaker123 says:

    Notes: 10/24/19
    – Riddle : the spots above the dog’s eyes trick predators into thinking the prey is awake, so that dog survives.
    – A good note is a lot like a good thesis statement. Detailed and doesn’t use “about” language.
    – Op-Ed will be 1000 words or about 5 pages.
    – The first sentence of an Op-Ed should be a strong claim with your opinion on the topic stated clearly.
    – Components of a Writing Plan: Thesis Statement, Background and Evidence, Sources you found, Sources you have not found and counterarguments you need to refute. Look at the Non-Portfolio tab to find the detailed version of these steps.

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  28. lelebxby says:

    Class Notes 10/24/19
    Dog Riddle
    In the riddle, we discussed the spots above a dogs eye, how a predator is less likely to attack with “eyes” starring back at it.
    Writing Plan
    Before writing our final Op-Ed paper, we must compose a writing plan that helps guide our points and opinions in a clear and pristine way.
    In the writing plan, we must include the following:
    ~thesis statement – make a clear and compelling claim on a very specific topic.
    ~background and evidence – summarize the material you’ve gathered in a few short paragraphs.
    ~sources found – provide links to the best material you have found to shape and support your point of view.
    ~sources haven’t found yet – indicates you know what’s missing from your argument.
    ~counterarguments to refute – acknowledge and refute obvious and strong arguments from other point of views.
    The writing plan is due midnight of Wednesday, the 30th of October.

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  29. smellycat23 says:

    Class started with a dog riddle where dog’s eyes look open to warn predators when they are sleeping. Our notes should resemble a thesis statement by packing one sentence with a lot of detail and does not include topic or about language.

    By October 31st, a writing plan for our Op-Ed will be submitted which is a Non-portfolio grade that is worth 20% of our overall grade. A thesis statement should be compelling and specific. A standard for an Op-Ed is having “reasonable and persuasive evidence.” In the article we read, “Whatever Guantanamo is Like, It Can’t be Worse Than This,” was a great example of an entry that includes persuasive evidence for on Op-Ed. In our writing plan, we must include background and evidence in a few short paragraphs which is compelling. Sources we must found and have not found must be listed as well and a paragraph about each should be included. Lastly, counterarguments I need to refute must be in the writing plan.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Nice work, Smellycat.

      our Op-Ed will be submitted which is a Non-portfolio grade that is worth 20% of our overall grade.

      To be clear, this one assignment goes into the NON-PORTFOLIO POOL of more than a dozen assignments that TOGETHER are worth 20% of your overall grade.
      3/3

      Like

  30. doglover441 says:

    -Riddle: The spots above dogs eyes, look like eyes, to warn predators
    -Thu oct 31, submit a Writing Plan for Op-Ed
    -Op-ed is opinion and on the editorial pages, blending of couple of writing, uses sources, does not require that you prove something
    -Can alert the reader to a way of thinking that is deep and complex that may make a good case
    -Op ed has to include a thesis statement and summary of your sources
    -Something you are looking for or a cry for help for example looking for stats that I can’t find myself
    -Author understands that not everyone will agree with their opinion and includes that in their writing
    -Not going to convince a jury with the information
    -Bad example of a thesis statement included “is a very controversial piece of legislature” which doesn’t help the main idea and should not use that statement unless the controversy was solved
    -Brief first draft of the essay submitted by Thu Nov 7th
    -The better background and evidence, the less writing we have to complete later

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