Op-Ed Draft – VoxPopuli

Action Needs to Be Taken Against China’s
Human Rights Abuses

The world should take more action against the tyrannical Chinese regime because they are one of the world’s worst human rights abusers. The People’s Republic of China has shown consistently throughout its seventy-year existence that it has little regard for even the most basic of its citizens rights. Action needs to be taken soon against China before the roots of tyranny spread outside of its borders. In the end, if nothing is done to hold China accountable for the atrocities they have committed so far, the fragile flame of democracy and freedom may start to fade worldwide.

Its not hard to find examples of China’s human rights abuses. There is far too many to list in a single essay. For example, many of the rights we enjoy as Americans such as freedom of speech and freedom of the press do not exist in China. Protests are handled with an iron fist as seen during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, and more recently with the pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong. Additionally, China’s treatment of minority groups such as the Uighur Muslims and the Falun Gong is atrocious and at worst could be classed as a form of genocide. Forced sterilizations and the harvesting of organs from political prisoners are also common practices in China.

Some may argue that there are countries that are just as bad, if not worse than China regarding human rights. The difference between China and these countries is their global influence and size. China is arguably the 2nd most powerful country behind the US, one of the two superpowers. If we take no action China’s influence will only grow potentially placing it as the most influential country on Earth. China’s has already let their territorial ambitions be known in the South China Sea and in Hong Kong. Imagine a world dominated by China, the consequences for human rights would be catastrophic.

So far, the world’s democracies have largely turned a blind eye to China’s savage treatment of their own citizens. The reason for this is that the West’s economy is largely dependent on China’s manufacturing capabilities and expansive consumer market. A large percentage of the world’s goods are manufactured in China due to a multitude of factors including cheap labor and China’s lax safety/environmental regulations. Many companies and countries don’t speak out against China in fear of losing access to the lucrative Chinese market. The placing of profits over morals is a common thread among companies who do business with China. China’s recent debacle with the NBA regarding one of their GM’s tweets concerning Hong Kong is one of the many examples of this phenomenon in action.

Although it may seem as if we are powerless against the evil Chinese empire, there are actions that can be taken. A military option would not work due to China’s large army and expansive nuclear arsenal. Instead we need to hit China where it counts, in their bank account. American companies pulling out of China and the placing of economic sanctions on China would knock the Chinese to its knees giving us the leverage needed to finally make progress on human rights in China.

To conclude, action must be taken soon against China. We cannot stand on the sidelines being a bystander to China’s heinous human rights abuses forever. China’s malevolent influence will only grow stronger as time passes. From both a humanitarian and political perspective it makes sense to counter China’s human rights abuses. At the end of the day, it is the ethical duty of the worlds democracies to ensure the flame of human rights is not stamped out.

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4 Responses to Op-Ed Draft – VoxPopuli

  1. davidbdale says:

    Your warning is pretty dire, Vox, and suggests that China might become so GLOBALLY powerful that its national abuses could spread worldwide. While that may be true, you certainly don’t need to be THAT grandiose to build urgency.

    You’re specific about the lack of rights and freedoms (naming several that Americans enjoy an the Chinese do not), but VERY vague about the treatment of protesters. In fact, all you do is name the places:
    Tiananmen: handled with an iron fist (what does that mean)?
    Hong Kong: pro-democracy demonstrations (no detailing of suppression at all)
    Uighur Muslims and Falun Gong: atrocious.

    Then, oddly, you detail sterilizations and force organ donations.

    I see you were serious about global domination (but on pretty slim evidence if Hong Kong and the South China Sea are your only examples). I wonder if you might want to investigate the OTHER way China is flexing its muscles around the planet, co-opting national governments with big capital investments that give the country HUGE influence over national economies and politics. It will dovetail nicely with your paranoia about supremacy.

    You name a counterargument (Some may argue that there are countries that are just as bad, if not worse than China regarding human rights), but neither agree not disagree. Don’t leave us hanging.

    Your reaction instead (The difference between China and these countries is their global influence and size) is a change of subject.

    Your “Big Markets Make the Moral Rules” paragraph is effective but could use a number or two. Otherwise, its claims are too familiar. And you use the same claims twice in successive sentences.
    First time:

    The West’s economy is largely dependent on China’s manufacturing capabilities and expansive consumer market.

    Second time, same facts:

    A large percentage of the world’s goods are manufactured in China . . . and many companies and countries don’t speak out against China in fear of losing access to the lucrative Chinese market.

    Even if your reader IS familiar with the NBA “debacle,” you still must EARN the point by NAMING your claim. For example:

    China’s recently STRONG-ARMED the NBA into RETREATING from even the SLIGHTEST QUESTIONING of its HUMAN RIGHTS RECORD.

    Same number of words, but the new version provides a useful Summary as a reminder of the story’s moral.

    Although it may seem as if we are powerless against the evil Chinese empire, there are actions that can be taken. A military option would not work due to China’s large army and expansive nuclear arsenal.

    Put these sentences together. (we seem powerless)=(a military strike is not possible). You have ONE qualifier, not two. Otherwise, the transition is too awkward (We can take actions: a Military option would not work.)

    Well, yeah. American companies could pull out. But . . . remember that irresistible lure of the cheap labor and the huge consumer market? Are you suggesting the government FORCE companies to leave? (China has LOTS of power over its industries. America at least pretends it does not.)

    You conclusion is pure rhetoric. Not a bad thing, but nothing new is still nothing new. Consider finding a fresh angle to offer, a surprising number or illustration. Conclusions can do more than merely sum up and rephrase what’s gone before.

    You’re off to a good start, Vox, despite my endless complaining. You’ve chosen an important topic, decided on a clear thesis, moved patiently through the steps of a cogent argument. In other words, a good first draft.

    Like

  2. davidbdale says:

    Couple troubling details about your very forceful opening paragraph, Vox. You may want to enlist the help of a grammatically-obsessed friend while you’re building your Portfolio. I color-coded some problems with number disagreement and apostrophe use. In one case, you use China to mean a single country. In the other, you use China to mean a group of people, for example.

    Like

  3. voxpopuli75 says:

    Would it be possible to get some feedback on if I effectively developed my argument through my body paragraphs and if my argument is clear. Thanks

    Like

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