CLASS 07: TUE SEP 24

Riddle About Fate

Blog Mechanics: Feedback Please

Writing Mechanics: Not Only, But Also

Lecture/Demo: Claim Types

33 Responses to CLASS 07: TUE SEP 24

  1. morra2024 says:

    09/24/19
    0. Yet again, the class starts with a riddle, this time about fate. As usual, the specifics of the riddle are impertinent to things in general. Main takeaway – direct quoting does not guarantee absence of confusion from the reader. For example, the expression that “everything happens for a reason,” can be interpreted from several standpoints: a) that things happened the way they did because they were destined to be that way; or b) nothing occurs without something else causing it. There is more interest in the reasons that led up to how something came to be (not necessarily talking about fate).

    1. The Professor created a separate Feedback category for us to put our work in if we need guidance. Our feedback requests should include maximum information about the help we seek with our LTE’s.

    2. Overview of a grammatical construct that causes great confusion: “Not only, but also.” The position of “not only” affects our interpretation. For example, “Leonardo painted the Mona Lisa not only for his enjoyment, but also to earn a commission,” and “Leonardo not only painted the Mona Lisa for his enjoyment, but also to earn a commission,” are both technically correct. However, the second one implies that in addition to painting the Mona Lisa, he did something else with it (e.g. protected it with coats of varnish), whereas the first means that apart from enjoying his work, Leonardo also got payed for it. Hence, the first example is overall better.

    3. Detailed analysis of a great amount of slightly confusing material – types of claims made in arguments. We initially distinguished between the Aristotelian method (which focuses on appeals to logic, emotions, and authority) and the convoluted Toulmin method (the mindset of going into every debate with the absolute intention of winning). Later we moved to the Rogerian model, where common ground between sides is found, misunderstandings resolved, and deeper, underlying principles of arguments are examined. Our goal is to be Rogerian ( the calm voice in the room) by focusing on clarification of the topic of debate, the specific arguments being made, as well as their necessity (or lack thereof).

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  2. Valcom says:

    [] We started class with a riddle where we had to read 4 paragraphs. Each paragraph had the same quote “everything happens for a reason.” After reading each one we had to discover what paragraphs were fate and which were just people saying this as an excuse.
    [] Feed Back Please – We must respond to the feedback we get back so that we show that we understand and cannot take the feedback back and apply it to the problem.
    [] We discussed the use of “not only, but also” and how it should be used in a sentence. The sentence you are reading can also change completely by using the words separately “not only” and “but also.”
    [] A single sentence can contain multiple claims.
    Ex – It was obvious the classroom was full (Obvious and full classroom)
    There are three main types created by Aristotle, Toulmin and Rogers. Aristotle’s way is to appeal to the audience without making a claim. Toulmin would make a claim and then back that claim with support. Rogers would find a simple common ground for people and then would look for a whole solution to all the problems.

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  3. Riddle About Fate – We read four different expressions of ‘fate’. We had to choose which expressions exemplified fate and which ones didn’t. Expressions 2 and 4 are the ones that showed the belief of fate because there was a positive outcome to them.

    Feedback Please – Prof. Hodges created a new category to be more responsive to our writing to give us feedback

    Not only, but also – Whatever immediately follows the ‘but also’ is added to the ‘not only’. What is said about the ‘not only’ is also said about the ‘but also’. We were given 5 different sentences and had to move the ‘not only’ phrases in the sentences if it were necessary. For example, “Leonardo not only painted the Mona Lisa for his enjoyment, but also to earn a commission.”, will become “Leonardo painted not only the Mona Lisa for his enjoyment, but also too earn a commission.”

    Claim Types – a claim is meant to be taken by truth. We spent time on the Toulmin model. A direct quote can be a claim. We have used this term in class so far to mean any assertion. Not all claims need to be proved. If writing with others that agree, we don’t need to prove our claims. If writing with others who disagree, we would need to prove our claims. We need to be the person to recognize the claims as they are. We examined the types of claims that had to be proven when Ava argued to with her parents. Causal claims: this thing caused that thing. Resemblance claims: this thing resembles that thing. Evaluation claims: compared to. Proposal claims: arguments usually follow a problem/solution/justification structure.

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  4. tenere84 says:

    At the beginning of class we distinguished between the belief in fate and other beliefs. The scenario was about a teen, Jay, causing a car accident with a woman, Kay. Looking at their decisions and beliefs in depth, it was determined that they had a mix of belief in fate and unrelated beliefs. When Jay’s father states the common phrase, “everything happens for a reason,” to him, he is stating that everything has a cause and effect; the car crash had to have had a literal, non-spiritual cause (e.g drunk or distracted driving). On the other hand, Kay believes her incident is a “wake-up call” that indicates a future change in her lifestyle; such a belief can definitely be considered a belief in fate. Meanwhile, when Dee says to her father, “everything happens for a reason,” she is attributing their success to the result of hard work, not fate.

    Students can only receive proper feedback not only if they are more specific in their request, but also if they continue to react to the professor’s feedback constructively. The more students ask and ask but do not contribute, the more likely they are to be ignored.

    The “not only, but also” discussion refers back to our lecture on word placement from a few weeks ago. Simply put, “not only, but also” can be used correctly if the “not only” part is placed in the appropriate spot, and “but also” immediately follows the comma. For example, the sentence, “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades,” implies that Tom Brady did an action other than “play” for the Patriots, while at the same time saying that he played also for the Renegades. The correct form of this sentence would be: “The quarterback played not only for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.”

    Multiple small claims built around fewer, larger claims makes for a good argument. Unstated claims that go by unnocticed, claims to which no readers would object, and claims that would readily be accepted by one’s intended audience are examples of claims that do not need to be supported by proof. Some claims may matter to one audience but not the other (e.g parents vs businesses).

    There are multiple types of claims, such as:
    1. Categorial Claims – Lasik belongs to the category effective surgeries.
    2. Definitional Claims – Radial keratonomy is a discredited experimental procedure using scalpels.
    3. Casual Claims – Glasses and contacts cause serious problems for divers; lasik would solve a serious problem for Ava.
    4. Resemblance Claims – Lasik today resembles eyeglasses and contacts lenses of yesterday.
    5. Evaluation Claims – Risks are minimal compared to proven results; the high initial investment is a bargain compared to a lifetime of escalating expenses.
    6. Proposal Claims – Should young adults get this operation for treatment of myopia?

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  5. comp0327 says:

    We started class with a riddle like always, but this riddle was different as we were asked to choose which character made a declaration of a belief in fate, which was really up to our own interpretation, depending on how we view fate.
    We then discussed the new feedback folder, which Prof. Hodges made for students who would like to request more feedback on LTE posts. We were asked to respond to feedback more often, as students who do so will be prioritized in the feedback process.
    We learned the importance of word placement in the Not Only, But Also exercise, as it can strengthen or weaken your writing when using the phrase, “Not only… But also”.
    We moved onto Claim types, learning the differences between the Aristotle, Toulemin, and Rogers models of argument. Prof. Hodges showed the difference between each model, and when/why each model could be useful in argument. We expanded on this topic when moving on to the Lasik surgery exercise, and the different ways Ava could make the argument for Lasik surgery to both her parents and the insurance company. We then discussed the new feedback folder, which Prof. Hodges made for students who would like to request more feedback on LTE posts. We were asked to respond to feedback more often, as students who do so will be prioritized in the feedback process.
    We learned the importance of word placement in the Not Only, But Also exercise, as it can strengthen or weaken your writing when using the phrase, “Not only… But also”.
    We moved onto Claim types, learning the differences between the Aristotle, Toulemin, and Rogers models of argument. Prof. Hodges showed the difference between each model, and when/why each model could be useful in argument. We expanded on this topic when moving on to the Lasik surgery exercise, and the different ways Ava could make the argument for Lasik surgery to both her parents and the insurance company.

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  6. lazybear8 says:

    Riddle about fate,
    Quotes by themself cannot fully be interpreted. Must use context to explain quotes. The same quotes can have different meanings depending on the sentence that follows/previous sentence.
    Use new category “Feedback Please” in order for prof. to see it quicker and more efficiently respond.
    The word that immediately follows the “not only” wants too be parallel.
    Claim Types
    Claims are assertions open to challenge. Not all claims need to be proved even if controversial. Unnecessary to prove a controversial claim, if it’s an opinion or you are writing for an audience that already agrees with you. Be voice that does not sway because of emotion but gives off emotion. Recognize shared values.

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  7. hershey515 says:

    Notes Comp 8 AM 9/24/19
    Riddle About Fate
    – [ ] In the beginning of class we discussed a riddle about fate and how fate was shown throughout the different paragraphs given
    Feedback
    – [ ] Professor Hodges brought to our attention on how efficient it is to be responding to feedback he gives on essays
    – [ ] When writing your feedback you must detail what type of feedback you would like to receive and post on the Feedback category
    Writing Mechanics
    – [ ] Discussion on how sentences structured may be considered sloppy and how to use “not only, but also”
    – [ ] Rewrote examples of how to use not only and but in sentences. Then we went over it as a class on how to accurately utilize those phrases
    Claim Types
    – [ ] Classical Model of argument (the Aristotelian method, they call it after Aristotle
    – [ ] Aristotle made appeals to his audience’s reason (logos)
    – [ ] To their emotions (pathos)
    – [ ] To their sense of ethics, character, and authority (ethos), without ever calling anything a claim.
    – [ ] Toulmin made claims which the thesis is the first claim then followed by many smaller claims
    – [ ] Supported them with grounds, based his arguments on warrants
    -the values on which the argument rests.
    – [ ] When writing your never writing to everyone but to a specific person

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  8. voxpopuli75 says:

    9/24/19
    – Feedback is important in writing as writing is a recursive process.
    – It is best to specify the type of feedback you desire when you seek feedback. Once you receive
    feedback make sure to reply in order to keep the conversation going.
    – A common source of confusion for readers is the badly constructed “not only. . . but also” construction. This is because it can be misunderstood. The issue is that you have to follow a verb with a verb or a noun with a noun. EX “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also scouted for them” NOT “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.”
    – Arguments are made up of claims, some of them no longer than a single word. Some claims need to be proved while others don’t. There are many types of claims; categorical(is X a Y?), definitional(what is a Y?), consequential(Does X cause Y?), resemblance(Is X like Y), evaluation(is X good or bad?, is X a good Y?), and proposal(Should we do X?). We use the different types for different audiences. Your audience should only be people you are trying to persuade, not everyone.

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  9. 9/24 Notes:
    -We began class with the daily riddle, which made us question what a belief in fate looks like in life.
    -The new feedback category makes it easier for students who want to receive feedback on their works while contributing to the feedback in a recursive manner with Dr. Hodges.
    *do not begin correcting grammatical errors in your paper until feedback was received, this will tempt you to form a bond with sentences that are grammatically correct, however not strong for your piece and will later become difficult to take out if necessary.
    – A claim can be simply one word, }”We have a crowded classroom, ” is a claim, however adding the word, “obviously, we have a crowded classroom,” asserts another claim inside of the claim. Word choice is imperative when making a claim.
    -Decide in you writing if you are writing for an audience that already agrees with you or one you’re trying to persuade to agree with you.
    -Toulmin wanted to win arguments, with better claims and better evidence, no matter what the consequences were
    -Rodgers believed in being the voice of reason, finding common ground, pleasing everyone’s opinion
    *Claims can always be disputed
    *Our papers will be Rodgers common ground*

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  10. In the start we had a refresher on understanding where the sentence was in the paragraph and to understand if the person believed in fate or not. During the feedback part, everyone was coached up on how feedback works in the class and that feedback stops coming to you if you do not reply back. When asking for feedback, be clear on what you want being looked over and polished. There is now a feedback category. ‘Not only, but also’ was an exercise in which we had to fix up not only, but also sentences. Not only followed by a verb also as to have but also followed by the same verb. The best thing to do is to put the verb in front of the not only. Arguments are made of claims. Claims may or may not need to be proved with facts. Aristotle used Ethos (ethics), Pathos (emotion) and, Logos (reason) to make others agree. Toulmin used grounds to support his claims. To make arguments more smooth, Rodgers said to find common ground and solve shared problems.

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  11. voxpopuli75 says:

    9/24/19
    – Feedback is important in writing as writing is a recursive process.
    – It is best to specify the type of feedback you desire when you seek feedback. Once you receive feedback make sure to reply in order to keep the conversation going.
    – A common source of confusion for readers is the badly constructed “not only. . . but also” construction. This is because it can be misunderstood. The issue is that you have to follow a verb with a verb or a noun with a noun. EX “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also scouted for them” NOT “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.”
    – Arguments are made up of claims, some of them no longer than a single word. Some claims need to be proved while others don’t. There are many types of claims; categorical(is X a Y?), definitional(what is a Y?), consequential(Does X cause Y?), resemblance(Is X like Y), evaluation(is X good or bad?, is X a good Y?), and proposal(Should we do X?). We use the different types for different audiences. Your audience should only be people you are trying to persuade, not everyone.

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  12. ajuuy7 says:

    At the start of class we are given a riddle which is meant to show us that with the same direct quote all things can be interpreted differently. It was interesting to determine whether or not the paragraphs had to do with fate or not because fate could be a different definition for everyone. We are told that feedback is a two way street and we need to put effort in and ask for feedback in order to get some back. We learned not to throw “not only, but also” into our essays whenever we think is necessary. When using these terms you really have to think about what you’re trying to say and see if it is actually correct. Aristotle did not make claims but just appealed to his audience in different ways. Toulmin supported his claims with evidence and wanted to win every argument. Rogers wants to agree and find a common ground. Not all claims need evidence or proof. To find deadlines click on portfolios tab.

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  13. roses0102 says:

    9/24 Notes
    -We started with a riddle. We reviewed 4 paragraphs and depicted which was fate and which was not. Also described the type of fate was used.
    -We then learned about the new page on the blog called feedback please, where Mister. Hodges will review and revise our posts and will have them all in an organized spot.
    -Always be direct and clear with what type of feedback you want to get on your post
    -We worked on “not only” “but also” and learned the difference between the two. Say what happened first , then describe what happened after. The 5 sentences we fixed were all correct except for one, where the “not only” had to be moved.
    -The worksheets given out were to help us understand that claims in writing can be small, and many claim can be placed into one statement. Also to determine what type of claim is made ( categorical, definitional, consequential, evaluation and proposal)
    -Claims need to be supported by evidence, and values or warrants need to be shared and universally appreciated between readers.
    – Claims don’t have to be proven, they can be disputed in different ways and supported with evidence.
    – To Avas parents, she would make categorical, definitional, and consequential claims to try to persuade her mom and that she is a good candidate for lasik surgery.

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  14. 9/24 Notes
    ~
    -Began class with a riddle about fate and whether or not certain paragraphs explained the belief of fate, of if the phrase “everything happens for a reason” was just an expression.
    -Learned how to give and receive decent feedback. It’s a loop to gain good feedback, not just one sided.
    -“Not only…but also”
    -Three claim styles by Aristotle,Toulmin, and Rogers.
    -Arguments and feedback!

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  15. ahntkd99 says:

    9/24
    Riddle about Fate
    – We read four different sentences
    – We reply that which paragraph expresses brief in fate
    Feedback Please
    – Leave a reply to your own work
    -Put your post into the Feedback please category
    Not Only, But Also
    – We read four sentences
    – We switch “not only, but also” in the sentences
    Claim Types
    – Aristotle made appeals to his audience’s reason, emotions, ethics, character, and authority
    – Toulmin made claims supported them with grounds
    Rogers concentrated on finding areas of common ground and solving shared problems

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  16. bmdpiano says:

    NOTES:

    Riddle:
    -The same quote or statement can be interpreted in many different ways depending on the context.

    Feedback:
    -Feedback is not just one sided. The student needs to ask for what kind of feedback they think they need. If the student does not keep up responses on feedback, the person giving feedback will not keep up with the feedback itself.
    -Feedback is like a cycle.
    -Be clear with feedback and detail the sort of help that is asked for.

    Grammar:
    -Not only, but also construction
    -Everybody knows the “not only” and the “but also” part is more unknown information to the reader.
    -Example: The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.
    This example is incorrect. What ever follows the “not only” must follow the “but also.” The word “played” should be place before “not only.”

    Claims:
    -A thesis and what it branches out into are all claims.
    -One word can create another claim. “Obviously, the classroom is very crowded.” The word “Obviously” is a claim on its own next to the claim that the classroom is crowded.
    -There are six types of claims. They are categorical, definitional, consequential, resemblance, evaluation, and proposal.
    -Something that seems very obvious can always be disputed.
    -Our claim should be the calm voice in the room. The voice of reason to get everyone on the same page.

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  17. Jayv23 says:

    Today in class we started off discussing declarations and whether or not fate had something to do with each. We went over feedback from the professor to the student and how it is important tot respond to the professors notes on our writings. we need to show interest in making our work better by replying back and forth with the professor in order to make our work better. while discussing not only but also, the professor expressed that whatever follows the not only must also follow the but also. We then went through sentences moving around the not only to make the sentence correct, example are provided in today’s agenda. Examples were given to us of different types of claims and how and when to use each claim.

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  18. mpsj13 says:

    Riddle About Fate
    – The same quoted words can hold a different intention behind them such as saying “everything happens for a reason” can be used as a statement of belief of fate or literally that every action and situation has a reason.
    Feedback
    – If one wants to receive feedback, they can both comment on their post asking for feedback and placing the assignment in feedback please folder.
    -If one wants proper feedback, they should actively interact with the professor.
    -The professor will respond to those who understand and ask for the feedback they need and continue to communicate with the professor.
    Writing Mechanics
    – In a “not only but also” construction, the words immediately following the “not only” is also true of the “but also.” For example, “the quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades” should be written as “the quarterback played not only for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades” or as “the quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also played for the Renegades.”
    – Whatever follows the “not only” should also follow the “but also.”
    Claim Types
    – Classical model- Aristotle used reason (logos), emotion (pathos), and their sense to ethics (ethos).
    – Toulmin model- “Toulmin made claims (the thesis is the first claim, followed by many smaller claims), supported them with grounds (we’d call it evidence), based his arguments on warrants (the values on which the argument rests), which in turn rest on backing (which no textbook adequately explains and which perplexes students and professors alike).”
    – Rogerian Model- “Rogers concentrated on finding areas of common ground and solving shared problems. After identifying where we agree, he examined differences of opinion or perhaps misunderstandings, compared recommended solutions and their limitations, then offered ways to resolve differences.”
    -Categorical claim asks is X a Y.
    -Definitional claim asks what is a Y
    -Consequential claims asks Does X cause Y
    – Resemblance claims as Is X like Y
    – Evaluation claims asks is X good or bad or is X a good Y
    – Proposal claims ask Should we do X

    Look at the tasks on the bar to find deadlines.

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  19. lucbe219 says:

    To begin class, our discussion is surrounded by the fact that we need to keep fixing and giving feedback to our professor so that he knows to help us perfect our papers. Next, we started talking about grammar rules and common sense in our writing. It is important that we know that the not only is also said about the but also. The not only comes before the but also statement. After, we skipped to talk about claims. All arguments, thesis’s, details, and sentences contain claims that do not need evidence to prove them. Claims are assertions open to disagreements.

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  20. lg102015 says:

    We start off class with a riddle about Fate, where we are asked to read 4 instances and decide which ones express belief in fate and which do not.
    We then talked about giving feedback, and professor told us that we in order to get feedback you need to ask about a specific type of feedback and don’t just be broad about it. He also feels that if you engage in the conversation about feedback he knows that the time he is pitting in with your writing in worth it because you care about what he is saying enough to respond and ask questions.
    “Not only, but also” is a phrase that is important to use, but you must know the proper context to use it in. When using this phrase you can not just use one part of it. The “but also” must always follow the not only in the sentence.
    Claim types
    When it comes to claims there are three types made up from Aristotle, Toulmin, and Rogerian. “Aristotle made appeals to his audience’s reason (logos), to their emotions (pathos), and to their sense of ethics, character, and authority (ethos), without ever calling anything a claim.
    Toulmin made claims (the thesis is the first claim, followed by many smaller claims), supported them with grounds (we’d call it evidence), based his arguments on warrants (the values on which the argument rests), which in turn rest on backing (which no textbook adequately explains and which perplexes students and professors alike).
    Rogers concentrated on finding areas of common ground and solving shared problems. After identifying where we agree, he examined differences of opinion or perhaps misunderstandings, compared recommended solutions and their limitations, then offered ways to resolve differences.”
    After understanding these we went over different examples of each type of claim. Like Categorical, Definitonal, Consequential, Resemblance, Evaluation, and Proposal.

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  21. jackso23 says:

    Today’s class started with a riddle on fate where it was determined that 2 of 4 responses to a prompt showed fate.
    We then moved on to discussing receiving and giving feedback in response to blogs and LTEs. Writing is a recursive process which is able to be responded to over and over once it is written.
    Keep giving feedback after feedback was given and keep editing as more feedback comes in. Click the “Feedback Please” selection and your writing will go directly to Dr. Hodges for feedback. Keep checking if he provided feedback. Detail what specific feedback you want to receive.
    We also discussed using “not only, but also” in our writing to demonstrate clarity.
    We discussed making claims to better solidify and argue a point.

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  22. kraemercali says:

    9/24
    fate riddles- 2 is good example of fate “Everything happens for a reason”
    Feedback Please- increase responsiveness
    reply to own work asking for the type of feedback you want
    not only, but also
    Arguments
    Aristotle uses Logos, Pathos, and Ethos.
    Toulmin
    Rogers- common ground
    different kinds of claims
    categorical definitional casual resemblance evaluation proposal

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  23. 09/24 Notes
    We begin class with a riddle. We are given four paragraphs, all using the expression “Everything happens for a reason”. We are asked to choose which paragraphs use this expression in reference to a belief in fate.
    A new category, “Feedback Please”, was created to increase responsiveness from the professor to give feedback.
    – reply to your own work asking for the type of feedback you seek (quick overview, in-depth reaction, etc.). Then post it using the new category.
    We move on to discuss the use of “not only, but also” and how they should be constructed in a sentence. The sentence may be interpreted differently if “not only” and “but also” is placed in the sentence in other ways.
    Models of Arguments:
    Aristotle- appeals to audience using Logos, Pathos, and Ethos.
    Toulmin- claims are made supported with grounds and based on warrants.
    Rogers- focuses on common ground and solving shared problems.
    (All three models make claims)
    Unstated claims, claims that no readers would be likely to object, and claims that are readily accepted to intended audience need No Proof.
    Categorical Claims: claims belonging to a category (ex. Ava belongs to the category good candidates for lasik.)
    Definitional Claims: using definitions to defend your claim. (ex. Lasik is advanced technologically-proven laser surgery)
    Casual Claims: claims showing possible cause and affect (ex. Lasik would solve a serious problem for Ava)
    Resemblance Claims: claim resembles other situations ( ex.Ava’s situation resembles her parents’ situations in their youth)
    Evaluation Claims: Compares claims
    Proposal Claims: offers solution ( can possibly appeal to ethos, pathos, and logos)

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  24. In the beginning of class, we started with an activity about fate. We read 4 different perspectives of situations where the quote “everything happens for a reason” is relevant. We had to individually pick which of the 4 paragraphs deals more with fate than the other 3 perspectives and explain. The, we completed another activity about using “not only….but also” in a sentence. We had 4 sentences and had to decipher if the “not only…but also” was used correctly. if it wasn’t we had to move its placement in the sentences.

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  25. bestbaker123 says:

    RIddle was interesting to interpret. Fate can be a tricky thing considering it is based off of people’s beliefs and morals. The exercise today just proved how fate can be misinterpreted and how it can change lives.
    Feedback Please is the category where you categorize your work into, if you want feedback from the Prof. Specifically ask if you need feedback on something immediately or something you want to target.
    “…not only, but also…” can’t be used when you need to be accurate.
    What not to say: “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.
    What TO say: “The quarterback played not only for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.
    Not only and but also needs to be used so it isn’t misinterpreted.
    Aristotle created “arguments.” Or really a model of an argument. He appealed to the emotions of people, used logistics and character without ever claiming anything
    Toulmin uses claims and supports them with evidence. Much more assertive and less humane
    Rogers try to find common ground so no claim is made. Want to resolve differences without confrontation.
    Claims can be from a word to a paragraph. Doesn’t take many words to form a claim.
    Claims which no readers would object, then you don’t need proof because it would be redundant.
    Categorizing claims help to build an argument. Choosing which claims work which audience is crucial.

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  26. There is a new way to receive feedback for writing responses. In this new category, it is called “Feedback Please”, and its purpose is to help improve writing. The feedback from us is also important in this new section. Responses will be given to those who give an explanation as to how they changed their work. This is a cycle of improvement in which it keeps going as long as you keep providing more feedback as to how you fixed it, and what you want fixed. The process by which you submit your work into “feedback please” is a simple option that is selected when publishing a post on the blog and is Professor Hodges’ new way of having his own to-do list. “Not only, but also” phrases are important when it comes to the way you word them. Examples include with the patriots quarterback sentence in which the adjectives, or nouns need to match. For example, you can say it’s not only windy, but also rainy, but you cannot say, it is not only windy, but also curly because the two do not match. Argumentation is split up by two different models. One of which is the Toulmin model in which their is a winner and a loser. Claims are made and backed up and are meant to destroy the opponent arguing against you. The second model is the Rogerian model. This model is more laid back and are used to find a common ground in the argument so both people or both sides are happy. Solutions are found by resolving differences in this type. Claims in an argument are tiny bits of information that can be used to argue against. Controversial claims are not required to be proven. It is unnecessary to be proven, because it is an opinion, not a fact, and in some cases the people reading what you wrote already agree with you. In a formal argument, we are meant to be the calm voice in the room. Sure, pathos can be used, but emotion is not supposed to peak out in arguments as it does on TV and with political candidates.

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  27. iamsleepy01 says:

    – As a class, we distinguish which has a belief in fate and which are not.
    – to get feedback quickly we should post on the category “Feedback Please” and should reply back to the professor.
    – The Not only, But also writing mechanic should be parallel for example: The QB not only played for the Patriots, but also manage the team.
    – Aristotle’s model of argument uses ethos, pathos, and logos. Toulmin’s model has claims, facts and backing. Roger’s model is more calm and non-aggressive. Make categorical claims depending on the person/author you are writing to.
    – To find for anything that is due, click on the Portfolio Task and click on the subcategories of the tab.

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  28. smellycat23 says:

    Direct quotation does not always establish what the author means in the quote. Context is important. We learned this through a riddle of fate. A car accident occurs and people affected by the car accident claim “Everything happens for a reason.” Not all quotes were declarations of fate and we had to decipher which one did. The way everyone said “Everything happens for a reason,” could be interpreted differently and that’s why context is key.

    Mr. Hodges also told us that in order to receive feedback, we should ask very specifically and continue the conversation. We should ask him to look at our third paragraph, for example, for grammar and sentence structure.

    Then we discussed writing mechanics with “not only, but also.” The first part of the sentence must be parallel to the second part. The statement, “the quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades,” is incorrect because it sounds like he should have done something else for the Patriots. Moving the word “played” in front of “not only,” makes the statement correct.

    We also discussed models of argument. Aristotle appealed to our emotions, ethics, and logic. Rogers wants to find a common ground and Toulmin based his arguments on warrants. The three of them make claims on what we intend to prove. Not all claims need to be proved even if it’s controversial because it would be unnecessary to prove an opinion. It is important to establish what one is actually arguing about too like Rogers would do. For example, if one is talking about guns, gun control could be a topic discussed or if the government has the right to enact gun control. Finally, we learned about x and y claims. Categorical claims are x is y and casual claims are x causes y.

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  29. compclass8 says:

    Whatever immediately follows the but also is added to the not only. What is said about the not only is also said about the but also. So you need to put the thing that is being said in front of the whole thing so it is also being said about the but also thing. A direct quote can be a claim. A claim is what you want to prove so you use it to challenge. It can be anything from a word to a paragraph. You are trying to make an argument. Be aware of the claim you are making and the audience you are speaking too.

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  30. athenapup4 says:

    9/24 Notes
    Class Riddle:
    “Everything Happens for a Reason”
    FeedBack:
    Be interactive in the feedback. Say what kind of feedback you wish to receive and what aspects of the writing you wish to be reviewed.
    Writing Mechanics:
    “Not only”… “But also” task
    Models of argument
    Aristotle made appeals to his audience’s reasons, emotions, ethically. Called it an argument but never claimed it.
    Toulmin made claims and supported them with grounds.
    Rogerian is the calm voice in the back of the room. Looking for solutions based on minimizing differences by finding a common ground.
    Claims are tiny little bits of an article open to challenge. It can be anywhere from a word to a paragraph.
    Not all claims need to be proved even if they are controversial. If your audience agrees with you than you don’t need to prove your claim.
    Claims Type Worksheet

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  31. lovericeandnoodles says:

    Proof is not required, redundant to tell people why they agree with you. Not all claims need to be proved at all, depending on audience, we make different sorts of arguments to different sorts of people.
    Be the person who recognizes claims for what they are and responds to them appropriately.
    Bunch of types of claims

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  32. lelebxby says:

    Riddle About Fate
    – To say “everything happens for a reason” can be taken as an excuse or a genuine belief in fate.
    – For you to truly accept the bad turn of events life throws at you, one must be able to change for the better.
    Feedback
    – Receiving feedback from the professor isn’t a one way streak.
    – To make the best essay, one must be active and communicative with the professor, unless you want to be ignored.
    Not Only, But Also
    – When using “Not only…But Also,” its important to understand how to correctly phrase it.
    – In the sentence “The quarterback not only played for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades,” it insinuates he did something other than playing for the Patriots. “Not only” did he play for the patriots, “but also” managed the patriots.
    -The proper use of “Not Only, But Also” in the example should be ” The quarterback played not only for the Patriots, but also for the Renegades.”
    Claim Types
    – There are three types of claims modeled by Aristotle, Toulmin and Rogers. Aristotle’s way is to appeal to his audience’s reason without ever calling anything to claim. Toulmin made claims and supported them with evidence and backing. Rogers concentrated on finding areas with common grounds and looked for an overall solution in his arguments.
    – When making your argument, it is also important to remember not all claims need to be proved.
    – Your paper in the calm voice in the room so it’s key to recognize the futility of arguing without making and defending clear claims.

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  33. Anonymous says:

    – As a class when over 4 different riddles and distinguish which are a belief in fate and which are not
    – To get feedback we post it for the “Feedback Please” category.
    – Not only, but also writing mechanic should be parallel for example: The QB not only played for Patriots, but also managed the team. Distinguish which sentence uses Not only, but also correctly
    – Aristotle’s model of argument appeals to ethos, pathos, and logos. Toulmin’s model make claims, has facts and backings. Roger’s model

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