CLASS 05: TUE SEP 17

Class Verification Date.

Your professor has verified the roster. Anyone who ever attended the class has been accounted for with the Registrar, including those who have since dropped the class. Our roster is now set.

End of Last Drop/Add Period.

To leave the class now, you’ll have to Withdraw through the Registrar. Discontinuing attendance IS NOT withdrawing, it’s merely accumulating absences and increasing the likelihood you’ll earn an F for the semester. So, if you decide to drop, do so formally, and early, while there is still no grade penalty.

Riddle

The World’s Simplest Card Trick, in which your professor attempts to demonstrate that the world is an amazing place and we are all miraculous.

Count/Noncount Nouns

In which the mysteries of Number/Amount and Less/Fewer are explored and unraveled. Does Trader Joe have more olive oil or more olive oils?

The Amazon Summary Exercise

Driving home the message that we can be completely wrong and still fair, and that we can be absolutely correct but still unfair.

The NFL Marijuana Rewrite Exercise

Your favorite NFL players are toking, and you get to (re)write about it. A little bit of homework to keep you busy for about an hour.

 

 

58 Responses to CLASS 05: TUE SEP 17

  1. bestbaker123 says:

    Notes 9/17: sorry I forgot to post my notes here!
    – World’s Simplest Card Trick: it shows how we shouldn’t take anything for granted. Those specific 52 cards have never been placed in the order they were placed today. Life is all about little miracles.
    – Learned noncount and count nouns. Noncount nouns are something that cannot be counted out. The difference is that count nouns are a number but a noncount noun uses the word “amount.”
    EX. “The number of raindrops” is a count noun. “The amount of rain” is a noncount noun.
    – “less rain” and “fewer raindrops”
    – Monopolies are defined as big corporations that don’t have any competitors.
    – Read an article about Amazon being a monopoly and did a summary test on which one was fair, inaccurate, and unfair.
    – Understand that an article can bash the author, but still be completely fair to the point of the author. Doesn’t have to be in favor of the author, but can still be a fair summary.

    Like

  2. comp0327 says:

    We began class with a card trick which Prof. Hodges claimed had never been done before. He simply shuffled the cards and laid them across the table in their order, however, the incredible part about this trick was the odds of it either having happened before or happening ever again. Prof. Hodges juxtaposed this to life itself, as our existence is nearly impossible.
    We continued by discussing count and noncount nouns, and editing a sentence with the proper count or noncount nouns. We then read an article about monopolies, especially Amazon, and the debate if Amazon is a monopoly or not.
    We then started our next assignment, which is revising one of three passages about drugs in the NFL.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Unless you’re already extremely comfortable with count/noncount nouns, your Notes should include an example or an explanation to remind you of the lesson. I like your review of the card trick. 🙂

      3/3
      Standards will toughen.

      Like

  3. Riddle (world’s simplest card trick)
    -Prof performed card trick by letting us the class shuffle a card deck 7 times
    -Then prof dealt all 52 cards out on a table and that was the trick
    -It’s a trick because the odds of this arrangement of cards is a near miracle and most likely has never happened before
    -Note: life is filled with miracles and the odds are against us so don’t take life for granted
    Count/Noncount nouns
    -The things we can count are described with more or fewer
    -The things we can’t count are described with more or less
    -Example: you can’t count the amount(noncount) of oil, but you can count the types(count) of oil
    The Amazon Summary Exercise
    -A monopoly is when an individual or company owns the majority or all the stake in a specific good, service, or resource.
    Exercise:
    -Summary 1: FAIR AND ACCURATE
    -Summary 2: INACCURATE – The author in this summary misinterprets Nocera’s claims.
    -Summary 3: UNFAIR – The author in this summary makes false claims about Nocera’s beliefs on the matter. For example, the author states that Nocera must clearly be a champion of lower prices for consumers no matter who gets crushed in the process.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Good Notes, Christopharo. What I love about the card trick is that it’s still a conundrum. Everything defies “the odds” that it would have turned out the way it did. So what is the meaning of calculating odds? Also, as an illustration, how utterly mind-blowing would it be if after seven shuffles the cards laid themselves out the way they’re packaged in an intact deck? A12345678910JQK of spades, etc.? That’s the one arrangement that would truly feel miraculous. Regarding your Summary Exercise, the Reply belongs on the Summary Exercise page. But I’m happy to see them anywhere. And you’re right about the unfairness of Summary 3. For more insight into the Summaries, see my red and green notes on the Summary Exercise page.

      3/3

      Like

  4. tenere84 says:

    Professor Hodges started class by giving us an important life lesson. He produced a set of cards, all from an entire deck. When he finished, he called it a miracle. Why might that be? The truth is that this exact pattern of cards is very unique and has an infinitesimally small chance of happening again. The bigger picture is that, conversely, that chance for all of us to merely exist right now is nothing short of a miracle. Because of that, we should never take life for granted and that we should appreciate it to the fullest.

    For another brief 10 minutes of class-by-class grammar correcting, we learned how to describe the quantity of count and non-count nouns. Though quantity can describe nouns, some simply cannot be described with an exact number. A common correlation of these nouns is that their plural forms don’t have the letter ‘s’ at the end. When describing a quantity of non-count nouns it is only appropriate to use adjectives such as “amount” rather than “number”. “Amount” doesn’t describe an exact number, but it does describe the magnitude of the quantity. For example, one cannot count a number of “evidences” so it does not make sense to say “a large number of evidence”. Count nouns, on the other hand, can be described by adjectives such as “number of” because they can be counted. One can say “a large number of votes.” It is also necessary to note that while “more” can be used to describe the quantity of nouns of both types, the antonym must be “fewer” for count nouns and “less” for non-count nouns.

    To build on our knowledge of accurate/inaccurate and fair/unfair summaries, we learned that a summary can be completely incorrect yet fair, and completely correct yet unfair. A common error of unfair summaries was discussed: taking things out of context. Some summaries take what the author said and take it completely out of context to deliberately misinterpret their views. It is somewhat easy to find, especially in quotes. One of the biggest examples was in one of the three summaries which we were told to interpret. Summary three, in particular, was unfair; it cherry-picked the quote, “Amazon is in clear violation of the country’s antitrust laws”, from the editor’s original statement: “What he doesn’t say — *because he can’t* — is that Amazon is in clear violation of the country’s antitrust laws. As Annie Lowrey and Matthew Yglesias both pointed out in blog posts (at New York magazine and Vox respectively), there is no possible way Amazon can legitimately be called a monopoly.” The original editor means to say that Amazon is not violating any laws, while the author of the summary gives it the complete opposite meaning. This is unfair because it deliberately makes the author look okay with Amazon violating federal laws, which is evidently not the case.

    Hopefully knowing these strategies will help us become more informed when reading the opinions of others as well as doing our class assignments.

    Like

  5. lucbe219 says:

    To start, the professor explained to us how you can almost never arrange 52 cards the same way again. He also discussed how everyday life is a miracle and to not take it for granted. Next, we talked about grammar and non-count nouns versus count nouns. Furthermore, we were taught the difference between describing something as having less or fewer in certain situations. There are 45 types of olive oil.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Next, we talked about grammar and non-count nouns versus count nouns.

      Lucbe, this is “talked about” language, the bane of Notes. It does nothing to remind you WHAT YOU LEARNED about a topic. An appropriate Note to accomplish that goal would be something like: Because we can count raindrops, we refer to the NUMBER of raindrops or FEWER raindrops. Because we cannot count rain, we refer to the AMOUNT of rain or LESS rain.

      1/3

      Like

  6. morra2024 says:

    09/17/19
    0. Class began with a deceptively simple card trick (a card deck, shuffled 7 times, is placed on the table in a unique order that has never been done before). Demonstration designed to show us just how miraculous every second of our life is, an idea that is very familiar to me for some reason…

    1. Covered an important grammatical aspect of writing – count vs noncount nouns. For example, “number of votes” would be correct (because votes can be counted). “Amount of votes”, however, is improper, as amount is used with words that are noncount, e.g. amount of rain or amount of money.

    2. An exercise to determine whether a summary is accurate/inaccurate and fair/unfair. Example article – “Amazon Plays Rough. So What?” by Joe Nocera. It’s important to note that it’s possible to be accurate and simultaneously unfair (words quoted out of context). Certain words of the original author can be italicized when necessary to debate them.

    Like

  7. mpsj13 says:

    Count and noncount nouns are nouns dealing with numbers and amounts respectively. It is appropriate for the word more to be used to describe both count and noncount nouns while the word less should be used to describe noncount nouns and the word fewer should be used to describe count nouns.
    Unfair quotes disregard the intention of the writers words and use the words to push their own agenda.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Good work, MP. Not a thorough as Morra’s Notes just above yours and therefore a little lacking. Morra’s Notes will become the new standard for 3/3. Yours would require an example of a Count and a Noncount Noun as used in correct grammar.

      2/3

      Like

  8. voxpopuli075 says:

    -Some nouns can be counted while others can’t. If we cant count it we refer to it with more or less. If we can count it we refer to it with fewer or amount.
    – Some entities can be referred to as count and non count nouns.
    – A monopoly is a company that controls an essential service and lacks competitors.
    – For a homework exercise we have to revise and polish an already written letter to the editor.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      12 weeks from now, will you be able to name a single Count Noun? Will you remember how it differs from a Noncount Noun? In VERY FEW words you could have said “Some nouns, like raindrops, can be counted while others, like rain, cannot. See what I mean?

      2/3

      Like

  9. We started with a simple card trick that has a high chance of you not being able to ever repeat the trick and this is the order in which the cards care shuffled/unshuffled. We then moved to grammar rules on count and non count words. Words like less are a noncount word and so for example “10 items or less” should really say “10 items or fewer”. After, we went over some Fair, Unfair, and Inaccurate post on another authors reply to Amazon. We then went over what a fair but inaccurate quote looked like. Once finished with that class work we went over the homework.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Your specific Note comparing “10 items or less” with “10 items or fewer” is enough to tie-break your Notes grade today, Doughnut. Missing it you might have fallen short.

      3/3

      Like

  10. Valcom says:

    Notes 9/17/19
    [] We started class with a magic trick, the magic trick was a card deck randomized seven times then all 52 cards were placed on the table. This is to show that there is a google chance that someone will get that exact same order on the table.
    [] Count/Noncount Nouns.
    Count: more or fewer
    Noncount: more or less
    [] Monopoly is a company that owns that has no competitors.
    [] Amazon Plays Rough – we read over an LTE about Amazon that claims Amazon is a monopoly. We then read three comments made about the post and had to decide which post was fair, inaccurate and unfair.
    [] The original writer in the LTE Amazon Plays Rough took words and twisted them into something that the original author did not mean.
    [] Homework is to read the article and the summaries made. We have to choose which summary is the best and how to make the summary better by making own edits in the comments.

    Like

  11. ajuuy7 says:

    In the beginning of class he told us we would be watching a card trick demonstration and after he laid all 52 cards on the table he explained that the randomness of the combination of cards was a miracle in itself. He told us to never take life for granted and I think that’s someone that everyone needs to hear once in awhile. We started learning count and noncount nouns which are probably a common mistake within the class. We then had to read a summary about Amazon being a possible monopoly and read summaries by 3 people and identify if they are unfair, inaccurate, and fair.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      I’m glad you thought the miracle of the cards was worth such a detailed Note, Ajuuy. The reason you didn’t earn 3 points for your Notes today is that you can’t tell from your Notes how to distinguish a Count from a Noncount Noun or how to modify them.

      2/3

      Like

  12. ahntkd99 says:

    9/17
    Count/Noncount Nouns
    – some different people shuffle a deck of cards.
    – He said cards have never done before because everytime the order will be different.
    Amazon Summary Exercise
    – monopoly:control of the supply of or trade in a commodity or service.
    – We read Amazon article and three types of summaries and we decided which one is unfair, fair, and inaccurate.
    – Original: The most offensive claim of my opponent is that women should never be elected to political office. -davidbdale-
    – Unfair Quote: In his speech to supporters, davidbdale said, “Women should never be elected to political office.”

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      I didn’t learn much from your Notes about the card trick or Noncount Nouns, Ahntkd, but you earned your third point by recording the specific Unfair Quote from the whiteboard.

      3/3

      Like

  13. 9/17 Notes:
    -We discussed appropriate usage of terms to describe count and noncount nouns
    -We took some time to look at examples of various fair, unfair, and inaccurate summaries of the Amazon article.
    -We discussed the way some quotes can be accurate, however unfair in it being taken out of context completely.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      We discussed appropriate usage of terms to describe count and noncount nouns.

      Wordsmith, this is “talked about” language, the bane of Notes. It does nothing to remind you WHAT YOU LEARNED about a topic. An appropriate Note to accomplish that goal would be something like: Because we can count raindrops, we refer to the NUMBER of raindrops or FEWER raindrops. Because we cannot count rain, we refer to the AMOUNT of rain or LESS rain.

      2/3

      Like

  14. bmdpiano says:

    NOTES:

    -Riddle:
    Dealing 52 cards has astronomical possibilities.

    -Count/Non-count Nouns:
    Identifying nouns by using more, less, fewer, etc. As an example, fewer used for things we can number, less for things that we can’t count.
    These words make the difference to be grammatically correct when using count or non-count nouns to describe an amount or number.
    We were asked to correct an example of a sentence with these types of errors. The word, “more” usually is not a problem, but the words, “less and fewer” are mistaken most of the time. These two words make a difference in being grammatically correct.

    -Amazon Exercise:
    We discussed what a monopoly is to make the definition clear for the Amazon article.
    We read the article as a class and then separately read three summaries of the article. We had to identify which summary was unfair, fair, or inaccurate and give reasons for thinking each way. The fair claim did not need explanation.

    -Letter Rewrite Exercise
    Begin class and finish for homework

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Good Notes, Piano, but with all the language you devoted to Less and Fewer, you still didn’t provide an example to remind yourself which one to use with which type of noun.

      3/3
      Standards will get tougher.

      Like

  15. 9/17
    NOTES
    Intro
    – Watched Professor perform a card trick that is practically impossible
    – Learned about count/noncount nouns
    – ‘Less’ is being used in place where ‘fewer’ should be being used
    – Different examples of what word would be placed in certain situations with nouns
    – Revised the short paragraph given with the right words like…Number and Fewer
    Amazon Summary Exercise
    – What’s a Monopoly?
    -Business that runs it self without any real competition
    – Read long article about Amazon and discussed how it can’t be considered a monopoly
    – We read the summaries given and decided whether we think they are accurate, inaccurate, or unfair, then we gave support on our reasoning
    – Finished comment on which summaries were accurate, inaccurate and unfair
    HW
    – Had to choose one of the LTE on the same topic that seems the most correct
    – Had to revise the letter and make it more persuasive and just overall better
    – Then edit our old LTE and make it better, too

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Good Notes, Cookie, but with all the language you devoted to Less and Fewer, you still didn’t provide an example to remind yourself which one to use with which type of noun.

      3/3
      Standards will get tougher.

      Like

  16. lg102015 says:

    To start off class the professor showed us the simplest card trick ever. Where he displayed a 52 deck of cards on a table and when he was done spreading them out, he told us the trick was that a deck of cards has never been displayed like that ever in this world. We learned from this trick that there are many thing in this world that have impossible odds but can happen.
    Then we went over count/noncount nouns, an example of this would be less is something we can count and fewer is something that we can’t count. Like when you are grocery shopping and the sign says 10 items or less or 10 items or fewer. The proper way to say it would be 10 items or fewer. We were then asked to fix a mini paragraph where we edited the proper way to write count/noncount nouns
    After that we did the amazon summary exercise, where we learned what a monopoly was. An example would be the US postal service which was more of a monopoly back then, then it is now. We had to read an article on the amazon book service, after reading it we read 3 short summaries and had to decided which one was fair, inaccurate, or unfair. The way that i saw it was that Summary 1 was unfair, summary 2 was inaccurate and summary 3 was fair.
    To end off class we went over tonights homework assignment on the NFL letter to the editor where we have to revise it and make it better.

    Like

  17. yankeefan25 says:

    We started off the class period by going over a “magic trick” where there were all the cards laid out. The cards were in a random order and went over the odds in which you could lay out the same pattern.
    We then started to go over count nouns. If you can count it you say more or less. “Ten items or fewer” is correct and “Ten items or less” is wrong. Fewer is things that we can count and less is things we cannot count.

    Like

  18. roses0102 says:

    9/17
    – We started class by doing a simple card trick, the cards were shuffled and placed into rows, Mr. Hodges told us that this order of card has never been done before.
    -We then talked about count/noncount nouns. You use noncount nouns for things that you cannon count or don’t have a specific number of items. You use count nouns when taking about items that can be counted.
    -We then retouched on the wrong/fair/accurate topic by reading an article about Amazon being a monopoly. We first read the article, then were told to determine which of the 3 summarys was fair, inaccurate, or unfair. Mr. Hodges went over 2 quotes written by himself, one being the original and one being unfair, yet still accurate quote. This personally helped me because I was confused by how an article can be unfair yet still accurate.
    -Mr. Hodges then explained out homework, 3 versions of a LTE, and all about the same topic. This hour homework assignment will be a rewrite of the articles.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      -We then talked about count/noncount nouns. You use noncount nouns for things that you cannon count or don’t have a specific number of items. You use count nouns when taking about items that can be counted.

      How does this help you remember which nouns require NUMBER and which require AMOUNT, which require LESS and which require FEWER?

      2/3

      Like

  19. Today’s Notes:
    today we are talking about how count and non count nouns. This topic is confusing me and I hope I can research this when I get back into my dorm. We began the class with a magical card trick teaching us to value ourselves and our lives for what they are, and enjoy it for what it is and to be grateful for it. “less voting, fewer votes”

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      —I can count raindrops, so it’s a Count Noun: MORE raindrops, FEWER raindrops, MANY raindrops, 345 raindrops.
      —I can’t count rain, so it’s a Noncount Noun: MORE rain, LESS rain, MUCH rain, LITTLE rain.

      2/3

      Like

  20. 09/17 Notes

    The professor goes around the room and makes 7 students shuffle a deck of cards. He lays the shuffled deck of cards on the table and explains how the order in which he laid the deck of cards has never been done before. The odds of that happening is 8 x 10^67, close to impossible.

    Count (number) and Noncount (amount) nouns
    Count-the number: more or fewer
    Noncount-amount: more or less

    Is Amazon a Monopoly?
    Monopoly – a company that has absolutely no competitors.
    We discuss the article “Amazon Plays Rough. So What?” written by Joe Nocera who claims Amazon cannot be a monopoly because the company has many competitors such as Walmart and Target. We take a look at 3 summaries and decide which of the three is fair, which is unfair, and which one is inaccurate.

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      Good Notes except how will this help you remember what words qualify as Count and Noncount Nouns?:

      Count (number) and Noncount (amount) nouns
      Count—the number: more or fewer (raindrops)
      Noncount—amount: more or less (rain)

      3/3
      Standards will toughen

      Like

  21. Class Notes Sept. 17
    – “World’s Simplest Card Trick” Riddle
    – Corrected count/noncount noun errors
    – Amazon Summary Exercise: determine which summary was fair, unfair, or inaccurate and explain.
    – Letter Rewrite Exercise: finish for homework

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      An outline approach to notes is no better than reading the Agenda itself for reminding you what you want to remember from every day’s lessons. Scan through the Notes above, Imagination, and see what it takes to earn a 3.

      1/3

      Like

  22. athenapup4 says:

    Notes 9/17
    Count and Non count Nouns.
    Some nouns can be counted, Ex: 1,2,3,4… examples, YES
    Some nouns cannot be counted, Ex: 1,2,3,4… evidence, NO
    If you don’t say the number of evidence that you have then you should also never say how many examples you have to offer in your essay
    Amazon Plays Rough
    Inaccurate and accurate summary review in class
    Further view on a fair summary, inaccurate summary and fair and accurate summary.
    Home Work: Choose a summary from the NFL rewrite exercise and help correct the LTE and improve the persuasiveness of the letter. Avoid adding things just changing words and formatting. (decide which one is the best model and then paste in the reply field.)

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      This is confusing:

      If you don’t say the number of evidence that you have then you should also never say how many examples you have to offer in your essay.

      Actually, you can say HOW MUCH evidence you have and also say HOW MANY PIECES of evidence you have.

      2/3

      Like

  23. smellycat23 says:

    Mr. Hodges started class with a card trick where he placed all 52 cards on the table face-up to show no one has ever placed the cards in that order before. He claims that humans are impossible too. The lesson was to not take the world for granted.
    We discussed count nouns and non count nouns. If a noun can be counted, one should say “the number of…” instead of “the amount of…” for non count nouns.
    Then we looked at an article discussing Amazon being a monopoly and summaries that were fair, inaccurate, and unfair. Deciphering which article is which is challenging but the exercise we did is helpful. For HW we are replying to an NFL Letter and making it better.

    Like

  24. hershey515 says:

    Comp 1 Tuesday 12

    Card Trick
    – [ ] At the start of class seven different people shuffle a duck of cards. The Prof. then layed them out onto the table demonstrating how this trick was never done before because every time you lay them out it’s in a different order.
    Amount and Number
    – [ ] In writing essays some nouns can or cannot be counted , no matter how many pieces of evidence you bring to your essay, you would never refer to the number of evidences. The pieces can be counted, but evidence cannot, so we refer to the amount of evidence.
    – [ ] We were able to find the mistakes in an example whereby we fixed errors that were amounts and numbers that shouldn’t be there
    Amazon Plays Rough
    – [ ] Monopoly is a company that has no competitors
    – [ ] Example article showing how one can be completely wrong but still fair in terms of the viewpoint
    – [ ] The writers pulled words from someone’s work that were true but then turned it around to something that was not meant by the author
    – [ ] As a class we all read the three different types of views that writers felt concerning the article and we had to depict what is unfair,fair, or inaccurate in the piece
    Homework
    – [ ] Then we discussed what the hw was, which was to decide what version out of the writings were the best and then make it become and even more better summary.

    Like

  25. lelebxby says:

    Notes 9/17/19
    After a simple yet nearly impossible card trick, we reviewed the differences between count and non-count nouns. How, count nouns are used when giving specific numbers like rain drops or statistics while non-count nouns are general, no specific amount of information.
    We additionally went over how to identify whether a summary if fair, unfair and inaccurate summaries once more by reading Joe Nocera’s article “Amazon Plays Rough. So What?’

    Like

    • davidbdale says:

      I don’t think this Note will help you use NonCount Nouns, Lelebxby:

      non-count nouns are general, no specific amount of information.

      Rain is a noncount noun, but we can refer to 3.125 inches of rain. Pretty specific. Which is the Count Noun and which is the Noncount Noun?

      2/3

      Like

  26. compclass8 says:

    Nouns with a specific amount of number examples can be counted. The nouns with no specific amount of number evidence cannot be counted. Watch the wording of how you use nouns/counting in essays.

    Like

  27. iamsleepy01 says:

    – Professor show the class on every of the simplest card trick ever that has never been done before.
    – Discuss the different between number(count) and amount(noncount)
    – amount and count is under the mechanic tab
    – Read a LTE about Amazon, 3 summaries and distinguished which are fair, unfair, or inaccurate.
    – Homework – rewrite and improve the version that we think is best.

    Like

  28. Today in class, professor started by laying out a deck of cards on a table after being shuffled seven times. He then explained to us that nobody has ever done this before in the history of card playing. Then we started reading an article about monopolies. The article spoke of Amazon being close to a monopoly. It doesn’t say it is a monopoly yet, but Amazon already rules a lot fo the marketing business with ebooks and online shopping in general. After being done with the article, we spoke in class about how summaries can be inaccurate but still fair, accurate and fair, and just completely wrong. After we were done with our article, we read 3 summaries of the same article and had to decipher which of the three was inaccurate, unfair, and fair.

    Like

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