LTE for Portfolio—whosyourcookie

Social Media Ruining Architecture?

In Alexandra Lange’s September 7th, 2019 article “Is Instagram Ruining Architecture?“, Lange expresses an imprecise argument on the fact of Instagram personally affecting the importance of architecture world wide. Although, posting pictures on Instagram is inevitable, most people are still visiting architectural land marks to gain knowledge and experience rather than likes on social media. Architectures have been around for many years and are being portrayed as social objects throughout society, but I’m contradicting Ms. Lange for the fact being there are still millions of people enjoying the true aspect of architecture rather than the lone fact of usage on social media.

Personally, I have journeyed to Williamsburg, VA with my family to encounter the architecture of the American Revolution during the 1600’s. Honestly, I took many pictures to indent the beautiful scenery that surrounded me into my memories, but the urge to post it to social media didn’t overcome the time I spent with family and the history that layed beneath me. Architecture is more than just a picture, its a way of life. Lange’s argument is that people see these posts and believe that they obtained the same information as if they ventured to the location and because of that, people don’t visit these architectures as done in past times . Lange’s argument is flat out inaccurate as I know many teachers, friends and family that dream of or have already achieved dreams of exploring architecture throughout different cultures.

If all world travelers continue to seek out their goals of seeing the world, architecture will continue to thrive at its best and true meaning of these passion filled places will be never be replaced. We can’t listen to Lange and agree with her argument of us humans turning into “sheep’s” when it comes to architecture just because people view Instagram posts and think they know what there seeing when really they don’t. There are still many world travelers and there will always be because imagination and dreams can’t be fulfilled through social media.

As much as I love social media, as many agree, I don’t believe architecture will be minimized to the point where people will view post on something and think, “I’ve seen enough. I don’t need visit that place in person”.

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5 Responses to LTE for Portfolio—whosyourcookie

  1. Thank you, Mister Hodges, I will surely begin fixing these issues and punctuation problems with my LTE. I may even trash my current LTE after reading what you said and I’m looking forward to making an overall better letter.

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    • davidbdale says:

      You’re welcome, Cookie, but I hope you won’t abandon this letter. Without calling you a coward, I want to characterize that decision as cowardly. This draft may be fraught, but I’ll be MUCH more impressed if you can make something amazing out of it.

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  2. davidbdale says:

    Hey, Cookie, I have many reactions to your post. Let’s rock.

    1.) First, a word about headlines. Usually, they’re written by a headline editor, not the author of the article. Pretty obviously, that’s the case here. There’s nothing in the article that suggests we’re collecting photos of someone else’s trip instead of traveling. It doesn’t appear to reflect the author’s opinion, which creates a problem for your letter. You may be responding to an idea that isn’t there.

    There is one hint of “sheepiness” in Lange’s article, but it’s merely that we tend to want to collect the “expected” photo of places we visit as if the experience of visiting the site has already been digested and approved before we arrived, and all we have to do is demonstrate we got there to validate our visit.

    THAT is an idea you could run with if it seems overstated to you.

    2.) Second, there are countless grammar, usage, and punctuation errors here that will need our attention eventually, but not yet. If my saying so makes you more attentive to the troubles, please correct or eliminate as many of them as you can in your next draft. Otherwise, be assured I will be available to identify them and their solutions when we do a final polish. BUT DON’T NEGLECT that final polish.

    3.) Your letter gives the impression that you are expanding and enlarging a single strong observation to play out to a certain respectable length. There’s more to be said on this topic than that we do or do not limit our travel as a reaction to social media. I urge you to think more expansively on your topic so that squeezing all your good ideas into such a small space becomes the problem.

    And now, if I may, I’d like to take an in-depth look at your first paragraph.

    In Alexandra Lange’s September 7th, 2019 article “Is Instagram Ruining Architecture?“, Lange expresses an imprecise argument on the fact of Instagram personally affecting the importance of architecture world wide.

    “An argument on the fact of Instagram affecting the importance of architecture” gives us no clear idea of how Instagram affects architecture, or the importance of architecture, Cookie. Since we don’t know the effect, we can’t know the argument, and we can’t begin to guess how the argument could be imprecise.

    If we haven’t read the article, we need more guidance. If we have read it, we need a reminder. Lange is a big fan of architecture, and she revels in its ability to share her passion with like-minded people. If she thinks it diminishes the importance of architecture, you need to tell us how.

    Although, posting pictures on Instagram is inevitable, most people are still visiting architectural land marks to gain knowledge and experience rather than likes on social media.

    This claim appears to be a clarification, but it’s hard to imagine how you’ll prove your claim that people visit architectural landmarks “to gain knowledge.” Hint: saying that you know people who do so won’t persuade a lot of readers.

    Architectures have been around for many years and are being portrayed as social objects throughout society, but I’m contradicting Ms. Lange for the fact being there are still millions of people enjoying the true aspect of architecture rather than the lone fact of usage on social media.

    If millions of people travel to St Mark’s Square to soak up the atmosphere and hear a tour guide explain the significance of the facades rather than to snap selfies, it’s still possible that Lange’s observations are correct. She thinks Instagram can be creative and transformative:

    There are plenty of people among Instagram’s 100 million users who march to the beat of their own aesthetic drum, sharing images of places and artifacts that will eventually be transformed into something new that will itself be posted on Instagram. With Instagram, you can copy or you can create. You can use it to contribute more visual delight to the digital world, or you can use it to collect digital souvenirs picked out by other people.

    My advice is that you spend some more time with the article [its author is a little cagey about expressing her thesis, so it’s not immediately obvious what she’s up to] and see if you can find a more subtle way to contradict or expand her observations. You know, create something new; contribute more delight to the world! 🙂

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  3. davidbdale says:

    Cookie, you didn’t make a specific Feedback request. I will return to offer feedback, but first I’ll respond to your classmates who gave me guidance about the sort of responses they wanted.

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  4. davidbdale says:

    Cookie, I removed your tags. We don’t use them. I put your post into just three categories, including Feedback Please. (I would never have looked for your Feedback request using tags.)

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