LTE Rewrite Exercise

Letter Rewrite Exercise

VERSION 1

“VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the arguement made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing proffesional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed profesional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there phyical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recomended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijauna, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would recieve a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

VERSION 2

“VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

VERSION 3

Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

VERSION 4

In the Reply field below, copy and paste whichever version you believe to be the best so far. Using it as your rough draft, improve this letter to the editor for clarity and persuasiveness but without adding material.

When you have finished, open your own current draft of your LTE and begin the honorable if sometimes frustrating work of making your writing less awful. 🙂

30 Responses to LTE Rewrite Exercise

  1. hershey515 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” The argument stated by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article from the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing proffesional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. Allowing professional athletes to use marijuana will make them seen as no longer positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there phyical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still re a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off fields activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  2. morra2024 says:

    Version 3 rewritten (draft modified with an attempt not to change the actual contents of the letter)

    The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile”, Nate Jackson, is seemingly a proponent of medical use of marijuana by NFL players. Finding the organization’s current marijuana-related policies absurd, Jackson states that “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” As a loyal fan of the NFL, I firmly believe that marijuana use would only negatively impact the athletes, resulting in them not only physical damage (due to reckless injuries from marijuana’s pain suppression), but also in their reputations being tarnished.

    In my youth, i was fortunate enough to be inspired by Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. If even medicinal use is to be allowed, future youth will erroneously think of marijuana as the shortcut to an athlete’s success in life. The aforementioned is most likely why the existing policies are strict: no organization, especially at the highest level of competition, wants to be known to promote drugs, particularly one that people do not know how to safely dose with.

    If Jackson’s absurd proposal affected the league’s current policy, the NFL would incur our wrath as diehard fans, disappointed in the decline of moral values.

    Like

  3. ahntkd99 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival from the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  4. “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.
    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins who were not just accomplished athletes but, model citizens as well. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?
    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”
    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  5. compclass8 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. As a child, I looked up to athletes such as Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins, like kids do today and if this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there phyical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be just like them. Children will begin to believe that marijuana will give them an athletic boost when playing sports from watching the N.F.L players. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recomended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijauna, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more famous athletes. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  6. “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. Because of this, if they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm with marijuana will potentially hurt the players, the fans and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  7. comp0327 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” claims Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that professional football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. While I am a fan of the NFL, I object to this idea. Professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were not just accomplished athletes, but accomplished citizens as well. Children always mimic their role models, which for many are their favorite athletes. If these athletes are known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to athletic success, or success in whatever the child is passionate about. The NFL can do without this sort of image, too. Does encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition seem like a good image to have?

    Jackson juxtaposes the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers, as well. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users may be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to this newfound sense of well-being or even enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users may not even receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their new so-called “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self-medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players may be injured more often, impressionable youth may take up marijuana, and the NFL may face the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values or drug policies. Thus, the NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  8. ajuuy7 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard football fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.
    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have always been a huge influence in my life. Athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins were always positive role models on and off the field as a kid and were well respected in the community. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.
    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.
    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would overestimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijauna, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not allow athletes to use this or any other controversial drug among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  9. Jayv23 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a die hard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there phsyical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have always been a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L. The league will be seen as it’s encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would harm the fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  10. Valcom says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. However if they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this image change too. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users are equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they will not become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    Allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would encounter the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  11. “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  12. roses0102 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article ( Article should be cited) posted in the New York Times. Jackson argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If the use of medical marijuana is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Today, children see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. Jackson fails to realize that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would overestimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  13. lazybear8 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the arguement made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing proffesional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete at their full potential.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league, including all of the individual players, will be seen as encouragers of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recomended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijauna, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would recieve a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  14. yankeefan25 says:

    Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I think that the integrity of the players being seen as positive role models will be compromised if they are playing under the influence.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. If the league were to relax its policies tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity, or even athletic success. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain. Especially if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And it is still unknown on how much marijuanna is a safe and healthy dose.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  15. iamsleepy01 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the claim made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article, he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed, professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also off the field. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an influencer of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, the players who use marijuana are responsible for their own dosage.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among any of the athletes within the league.

    Like

  16. Anonymous says:

    Nate Jackson disgustingly encouraged the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana” The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile idiotically believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re always playing high.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And, obviously, nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana.

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd.

    Like

  17. smellycat23 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a die hard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins because they were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain because their physical ability will be distorted and their pain tolerance will be elevated. Who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.” This would leave an ignorant athlete to determine how much marijuana to smoke before the game. Does that sound safe to you?

    Imagine your son using marijuana before a football game and injuring himself and other players because of it. How disappointed would you and the fans be? Your son would be influencing young boys and girls to use marijuana as well because it’s the “popular” thing to do since he’s an NFL player. An older generation of fans would look down upon the league for the decline of moral values the league has. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  18. “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile”, and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field, but also as stand out citizens. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury. This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, whereas painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players’ job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be an issue for the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would overestimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset, older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  19. gcatt310 says:

    Nate Jackson would encourage the medicinal use of marijuana by NFL players because “Virtually every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana”, The author of Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile believes the NFL’s current policy of suspending players who test positive for marijuana use is absurd. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high. Implementing marijuana into the mechanics of football will only promote an illegal drug to the millions of people who enjoy the sport.

    As a child, I was lucky to have model citizens like Philadelphia Eagles Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins to emulate. Tomorrow’s youth will be likely to think smoking weed is a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success if the league relaxes its policy. Does the NFL want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition? Promoting illegal drugs to the youth of football will only cause longterm issues in the sports community. Marijuana won’t stop in football, this wave will spread into other sports and soon smoking weed and being high will become apart of sports. Is that the future we want for sports?

    Jackson’s comparison of marijuana to prescription painkillers misses an important point: tokers will be just as likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, especially so if being high makes them feel invulnerable. And nobody knows how to safely dose with marijuana. Where will the marijuana usage stop? Will it just be used for medical use or will this become commonplace before games for fun or good luck?

    Along with the injuries and the negative influence on kids, the NFL would incur the wrath of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. It’s Jackson’s proposal, not the league’s current policy, that is absurd. As a country that loves football and its players, let’s band together and put a stop to marijuana being used in the NFL. The NFL is not a place for drugs its a place for hard work and dedication, mixing marijuana into football will only cause negative drawbacks in society.

    Like

  20. bmdpiano says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. (EDIT: The name of the article should be cited with its proper title). In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a die hard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this were to be a reality, professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also as genuinely good people. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible, especially of they are aspiring athletes. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will look as if they’re advocating for illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury. This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game and this could be detrimental to their health and the reputation of the N.F.L.

    Allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. If the athletes and others in favor of marijuana use understood how they influenced the youth, they would reconsider their standing. The N.F.L. owes it to their fans and themselves to represent a healthy life style.

    OVERALL EDITING NOTES:
    -Misspelled words were fixed
    -New York Times article should be properly cited
    -Sentences were reconstructed
    -The last paragraph did not hold a rhetorical flourish or truth so this was added.

    Like

  21. “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I recognize the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. Professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of their physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. For me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activity. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure not only has a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as a supporter of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Here, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dosage. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    Allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would be a negative to the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should never encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  22. athenapup4 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If the role models children are looking up to today are known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users do not receive the much needed medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  23. bestbaker123 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” argues Nate Jackson, author “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a diehard N.F.L. fan, I can understand the dangers of allowing players to play under the influence of marijuana. If the professional athletes are allowed to do this, they will no longer be seen as positive role models. They also will be playing without fully understanding how the marijuana affects their physical abilities. This could in turn lead to more sport injuries which are harmful to the athletes and the N.F.L league in the long term.

    As a South Jersey resident, the Philadelphia Eagles have always been a big influence in my life. As a child I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. These two are the best examples of athletes being positive role models on the field but also off field. Like I once did, children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourager of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition. It would become national debate as to whether using drugs when playing on the field is ethical and if it’s medically logical.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and at a high risks of addiction. However, what Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury. These players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Also, painkillers are used in moderation and have to be prescribed by a physician. Most marijuana users are using it recreationally or without a prescription. So in turn, the self medication of marijuana before a N.F.L. game, could lead to a negative perception of the atheletes and there would be a risk of overdosing too.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate themselves with marijuana would have negative effects on the players, fans, and the N.F.L. as a whole. The professional atheltes would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries overall. Young admirers of the athletes would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be more like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would be a target of negative feedback from upset parents of young marijuana consumers, and the older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. shouldn’t encourage self medication of a controversial drug among their professional players.

    Like

  24. voxpopuli075 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” Jackson, who is also the author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I disagree with Jackson because professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing under the influence of marijuana.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles such as Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, these players were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL’s image will suffer as well. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self-medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be injured more often, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of the NFL’s moral values. The NFL should resist the use of marijuana by its players.

    Like

  25. lucbe219 says:

    VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.” This is the argument made by Nate Jackson, author of both “Slow Getting Up: A Story of N.F.L. Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” and a recent article posted in the New York Times. In Jackson’s article he argues that marijuana (medicinal or non-medicinal) should be allowed in the N.F.L. due to its medicating effects. As a die hard N.F.L. fan, I acknowledge the dangers of allowing professional football players to work under the influence of marijuana. If this is allowed professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to compete with a full understanding of there physical abilities, leading to more sports injuries.

    Growing up in South Jersey, the Philadelphia Eagles have been and still are a big influence in my life. As a child, I looked up to athletes like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, these athletes were positive role models, not just on the field but also in their off field activites. Children today see their favorite N.F.L. athletes and aspire to be like them in every way possible. If marijuana use is allowed within the N.F.L., children will begin to believe that marijuana will make them popular like the stars on the field, or that the drug will give them an athletic boost when playing sports. This type of exposure doesn’t only have a negative influence on society’s youth, but also on the N.F.L., as the league will be seen as an encourage of illegal drug use at the highest level of competition.

    In Jackson’s article, he compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. Jackson writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” With this quote, Jackson states that painkillers keep players in a perpetual state of injury and risk creating new addicts. What Jackson fails to realize is that marijuana users will fall under the same perpetual state of injury; This is because these players will compete with a blurred view of their physical ability and a momentarily higher pain tolerance. Another problem is that most marijuana users are self-prescribed, where painkillers are handed out by physicians and have a recommended dose. Therefore, it would be the players job to determine how high to get before each game.

    In conclusion, allowing N.F.L. players to self medicate with marijuana would have a negative affect on the players, fans, and N.F.L. as a whole. Players would over-estimate their athletic abilities due to the effects of marijuana, causing an increase in injuries. America’s youth would begin consuming more marijuana as they aspire to be like their favorite athletes and gain competitive advantages on the field. The N.F.L. would receive a backlash of negative feedback from an upset older generation for allowing their athletes to self-medicate themselves with marijuana. The N.F.L. should not encourage drug use among the admired athletes within the league.

    Like

  26. tenere84 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that professional football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a die-hard NFL fan, I believe that professional athletes under the influence of marijuana will be seen as negative role models and unable to safely compete.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles players such as Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, my role models were not only accomplished athletes but model citizens as well. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success to children, who always emulate their favorite athletes. The NFL can do without this sort of image change, too. Does the league want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” However, marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain. Who is to say they will not become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not receive proper medical guidance about the correct dose of their “medication.”

    The NFL should not allow its players to use illegal drugs. Doing so would harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would get injured more often, the impressionable youth would start using marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values.

    Like

  27. mpsj13 says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children aspire to emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, children will come to see marijuana as a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. This sort of image change could leave the NFL to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition.

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” But marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain. It is also likely that they will become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability. Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not have received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication” leading to further risk of health issues.

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  28. VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles players such as Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Lucky for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. If they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    The author Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” This may seem efficient to some, however, marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    In conclusion, allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

  29. lelebxby says:

    “VIRTUALLY every single player in the NFL has a certifiable need for medical marijuana,” says Nate Jackson, in his New York Times article, “The NFL’s Absurd Marijuana Policy.” The author of “Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile” argues that pro football players should be permitted to medicate themselves with marijuana. As a diehard NFL fan, I object that professional athletes will no longer be seen as positive role models, nor will they be able to safely compete, if they’re playing high.

    Growing up in South Jersey, I was influenced by Philadelphia Eagles like Donovan McNabb and Brian Dawkins. Luckily for me, my role models were model citizens, not just accomplished athletes. Children always emulate their favorite athletes. Because of this, if they’re known to be smoking weed, marijuana will seem like a shortcut to popularity or even athletic success. The NFL can do without this sort of image change too. Does it want to be seen as encouraging illegal drug use at the highest level of sports competition?

    Jackson compares the use of marijuana to the use of painkillers. He writes: “The policy reflects outdated views on marijuana and pain management, punishes players who seek an alternative to painkillers, keeps them in a perpetual state of injury and injury management, and risks creating new addicts.” Marijuana users will be equally likely to injure themselves if they play without pain, and who’s to say they won’t become addicted to the sense of well-being and enhanced ability? Furthermore, self-prescribed marijuana users will not received medical guidance about the correct dose for their “medication.”

    By allowing NFL players to self medicate will harm the players, the fans, and the league. Players would be more often injured, impressionable youth would take up marijuana, and the NFL would incur the wrath of an older generation of fans disappointed in the decline of moral values. The NFL should resist the use of illegal drugs by its players.

    Like

Leave a Reply to drippydoughnut Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s